Loading...

Prenatal Steroid Treatment May Improve Survival for Extremely Preterm Infants

September 26, 2022 by TWN Staff
(Neonatal Research Network photo)

WASHINGTON — Steroid treatment before birth appears to improve survival and reduce complications among extremely preterm infants, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. 

Antenatal steroid therapy, given to women at risk of preterm delivery, causes the fetal lungs to mature and has been shown to improve survival and reduce complications among infants born from 24 to 34 weeks of pregnancy. 

However, previous studies of the treatment for infants born between the 22nd and 23rd week — those at greatest risk for death and disability — were inconclusive, a press release from the NIH said.

The study was conducted by Dr. Sanjay Chawla at Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, and Wayne State University, Detroit, and colleagues at 17 other U.S. research institutions.

Their findings first appeared in JAMA Network Open.

Of the mothers of the 431 infants in the study, 110 did not receive the steroid betamethasone, 80 received partial treatment (one dose) and 241 received complete treatment (two doses 24 hours apart).

Of the infants exposed to complete treatment, 53.9% survived until hospital discharge, compared to 37.5% with partial treatment and 35.5% with no treatment. 

Compared to infants receiving no treatment, infants exposed to full treatment were 1.95 times more likely to survive and 2.74 times more likely to survive without major complications such as severe bleeding in the brain, severe lung disease (bronchopulmonary dysplasia), cysts in brain, severe inflammation of the intestines (necrotizing enterocolitis) or abnormal blood vessel growth in the retina (retinopathy of prematurity needing treatment).

The study authors concluded that their results provide strong evidence to support giving antenatal steroid therapy to pregnant people at risk for delivery at 22 weeks.

Funding for the research was provided by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

Dan can be reached at dan@thewellnews.com and at https://twitter.com/DanMcCue.

In The News

Health

Voting

Research

November 30, 2022
by TWN Staff
Experimental Drug Appears to Slow Down Alzheimer’s Disease

An experimental drug that removes a substance called amyloid — a toxic protein — from the brain appears to slow... Read More

An experimental drug that removes a substance called amyloid — a toxic protein — from the brain appears to slow down Alzheimer's disease. The drug, lecanemab, reduced the rate of cognitive decline by 27% in a study of nearly 1,800 people in the early stages of... Read More

November 28, 2022
by Dan McCue
Deadline Extended to Apply to Be Bioenergy Project Reviewer

WASHINGTON — The Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office has extended its application deadline for subject matter experts wishing to... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office has extended its application deadline for subject matter experts wishing to participate in its 2023 Project Peer Review.  The extension is part of the office’s ongoing effort to expand its reviewer pool to broaden participation and create... Read More

November 15, 2022
by TWN Staff
Case Western Reserve University Awarded $7.3M for Eye Research

CLEVELAND — Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $7.3 million grant from the National... Read More

CLEVELAND — Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $7.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to identify new technology, methods and models to study the impact of inflammation and pain on the surface of the eye. “The cornea... Read More

November 15, 2022
by Dan McCue
Researchers Begin Study of IV Iron Treatment for Post-Pregnancy Anemia

WASHINGTON — Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health are launching a large-scale study to evaluate a single dose... Read More

WASHINGTON — Researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health are launching a large-scale study to evaluate a single dose of intravenous iron to treat women experiencing anemia after giving birth.  The study will enroll nearly 5,000 women in Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of... Read More

November 2, 2022
by Dan McCue
Personalized Kidney Screening Could Reduce Type 1 Diabetes Costs

WASHINGTON — Taking a personalized approach to kidney disease screening for people with type 1 diabetes may reduce the time... Read More

WASHINGTON — Taking a personalized approach to kidney disease screening for people with type 1 diabetes may reduce the time chronic kidney disease goes undetected and reduce the cost of treatment, according to a new study. The new analysis, which was performed by the Epidemiology of... Read More

November 1, 2022
by Dan McCue
Abortions Declined 6% Nationwide in Immediate Aftermath of Dobbs Ruling

WASHINGTON — Legal abortions across the United States declined by more than 10,000, or about 6%, in the two months... Read More

WASHINGTON — Legal abortions across the United States declined by more than 10,000, or about 6%, in the two months after the Supreme Court overturned its landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which for five decades had guaranteed a woman's constitutional right to the procedure. Meanwhile, states... Read More

News From The Well