Research Links Coffee Consumption to Longer Life

May 27, 2021 by TWN Staff
Research Links Coffee Consumption to Longer Life

Consuming more than three cups of coffee per day can decrease the risk of “all- cause mortality,” according to recent research from South Korea published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The researchers were examining the association between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality risks in the Korean population.

In total, 173,209 participants aged 40 years and older from the study were enrolled between 2004 and 2013.

But the researchers were particularly interested in the impact of coffee consumption on the 110,920 participants without cancer, cardiovascular disease or diabetes and how it impacted their mortality through Dec. 31, 2018.

What they found is that compared with non-consumers of coffee, participants who consumed more than three cups per day had a reduced risk of all-cause mortality. Participants who consumed one or up to three cups a day had a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease-related mortality.

The reseachers said the study provides evidence that greater coffee consumption is associated with a decreased risk of all-cause mortality and even moderate coffee consumption is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality — and this held true regardless of the type of coffee.

The researchers included Seong-Ah Kim, Ph.D., a research fellow at The Seoul Institute; Li-Juan Tan, a graduate student in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Chung-Ang University; and Sangah Shin, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Food and Nutrition at Chung-Ang University.

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