facebook linkedin twitter

Global Summit Leaders Aim to End Sexual Exploitation

July 21, 2021 by Alexa Hornbeck

The Coalition to End Sexual Exploitation Online Global Summit, hosted by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, is holding a week-long event, July 20-24, that brings together professionals from sexual abuse and exploitation sectors to discuss how to connect, educate and solve the tangled web of sexual exploitation.

“We’re not just about managing the trauma or trends, we need people to reject sexual abuse and exploitations whenever and wherever they see it,” said Dawn Hawkins, the host of the summit and senior vice president and executive director at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation. 

According to research from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 90% of public mental health clients have been exposed to multiple traumas. Their findings also show that 75% of women and men in substance abuse treatment have reported abuse and trauma histories.

The global summit which started in 2014, is hosting over 10,000 people this year from over 80 countries; professionals; political leaders; public health officials; police officers; and victims presenting research and sharing their voices.

One of the biggest issues being discussed by summit leaders, so far, is how to end the consumer demand for sexual exploitation, as studies show that 20% of men have purchased sex in their lifetime, and 6% of those men are doing this within a given year.

“I would say the majority of those … I arrested were the prostitutes, rather than the customer or demand base,” said Stephany Powell, who worked as an officer for the Los Angeles Police Department for over 25 years. 

A few of the sessions focus on early prevention of sexual exploitation by targeting children’s behaviors, such as how to protect children if their parents are pimps, or age-by-age recommendations for parents to develop porn-resistance in children using critical toolsets, mindsets and skill sets.

Other sessions focus on the economic impact of COVID-19 on women, and the increase in the number of men demanding access to women’s bodies online. This has been seen on platforms such as OnlyFans, an online subscription service which allows pimps and traffickers to insidiously recruit and groom women and girls into online sexual exploitation for payment. 

The event is also digging into the specific types of work in which individuals may experience higher risk of sexual exploitation, including residential facilities, the porn industry, massage businesses, and legal prostitution outside of the U.S. 

For women who live in territories prone to conflict such as India or Cameroon, the event highlights how those women are at higher risk of sexual exploitation, which has been made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Sessions at the end of the week will focus on models of ending sexual exploitation which have worked in other countries, such as a Swedish survivor organization called Not Your Whore and a Danish study of adolescent experience in pornography and its impact on policy. 

Also, how cultural literacy in places like Budapest and Germany has improved legislation regarding sex trade and exploitation. 

The summit offers solutions for combatting trauma for survivors, through things like trauma-informed care, especially when this care is performed through the lens of implicit bias, or how to partner with churches to prevent and respond to sexual exploitation. 

Other targeted interventions in upcoming sessions will focus on behavioral changes through positive messaging, stress management, dismantling the “Madonna-whore” patriarchal construct, addressing compassion fatigue, trauma resiliency, and investing in survivor leadership. 

The summit will continue through the end of the week, with the goal of shedding light on the global lessons learned throughout history regarding sexual exploitation, so that the same mistakes will not be repeated in the future. 

“This summit is not about talking, this summit is about action and solutions,” said Hawkins.

Mental Health

October 15, 2021
by Reece Nations
Texas Removes LGBTQ Youth Suicide Hotline After Primary Challenger Goads Abbott

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services has taken down a webpage that offered resources to... Read More

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas Department of Family and Protective Services has taken down a webpage that offered resources to LGBTQ youth after criticism was leveled at Gov. Greg Abbott by a primary challenger for its inclusion. Former Texas state Sen. Don Huffines, who announced his... Read More

October 7, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Eating Within Consistent 10-Hour Window Reduces Risk of Chronic Diseases

Researchers from the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Salk Institute conducted a review of time-restricted eating that shows... Read More

Researchers from the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Salk Institute conducted a review of time-restricted eating that shows eating within an 8-10-hour window can reduce the risk of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and heart disease.  “Just like to be productive we plan our... Read More

October 6, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Mental Health Practices Are Changing in Work Places

A new report from Mind Share Partners, a non-profit changing the culture of workplace mental health, finds that there has... Read More

A new report from Mind Share Partners, a non-profit changing the culture of workplace mental health, finds that there has been an increase in employees leaving jobs for mental health reasons, and companies are taking new steps to address employee's mental health. As a follow-up to... Read More

COVID-Related Attacks Prompt Hospital to Issue Panic Buttons

Nurses and hundreds of other staff members will soon begin wearing panic buttons at a Missouri hospital where assaults on... Read More

Nurses and hundreds of other staff members will soon begin wearing panic buttons at a Missouri hospital where assaults on workers tripled after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Cox Medical Center Branson is using grant money to add buttons to identification badges worn by up... Read More

Is John Hinckley, Who Shot Reagan, No Longer a Threat?

Lawyers are scheduled to meet in federal court on Monday to discuss whether John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried... Read More

Lawyers are scheduled to meet in federal court on Monday to discuss whether John Hinckley Jr., the man who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan, should be freed from court-imposed restrictions including overseeing his medical care and keeping up with his computer passwords. Since Hinckley, 66,... Read More

September 22, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
OSHA Will Issue Federal Heat Standard for U.S. Workplaces 

WASHINGTON -- Extreme heat has played a role in worsening health outcomes, especially for minority communities and for construction and... Read More

WASHINGTON -- Extreme heat has played a role in worsening health outcomes, especially for minority communities and for construction and farm workers at risk of heat stroke.  In response to rising temperatures due to climate change, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is set to issue... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top