Enhanced Risk of PTSD for Frontline Health Workers

April 13, 2021 by Alexa Hornbeck
Arlene Colom, a nurse from Premier Family Health, adjusts her PPE as she waits for a patient to test for COVID-19 in Wellington, May 13, 2020. (Allen Eyesstone/Palm Beach Post/TNS)

A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests that more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. 

“There is a lack of willingness to deal with the effects of trauma across all our culture, and this is a good time to make that a priority,” said co-author of the study, Dr. Andrew James Smith, the director of the occupational training program at the University of Utah Health. 

Researchers recruited 571 emergency and hospital personnel from the United States’ Rocky Mountain region to complete self-report surveys between April 1, 2020 and May 7, 2020. Researchers noticed that as positive cases of COVID-19 increased, anxiety for frontline workers decreased. 

“Before the pandemic hit, there were upticks in self-soothing, like alcohol consumption, to reduce the anxiety of the anticipated nightmare, but when the event came, we saw the inverse situation that as disease totals rose, the anxiety went down,” said Smith. 

According to the report, participants with an immunocompromised condition, or those who had a family member with an immunocompromised condition, were at increased risk for acute traumatic stress, anxiety, depression, and insufficient sleep. 

“Frontline workers have continually experienced the fear of transmitting the virus to family members, this aspect was paradoxically experienced as a perennial sense of guilt,” said Alessandro Russo, an associate professor of Infectious Diseases at Sapienza University of Rome. 

In January, Russo and his team examined the relationship between COVID-19 and occurrence of traumatic stress and found that risk factors such as, “young age, low work experience, female gender, heavy workload, working in unsafe settings, and lack of training and social support,” are often predictors of PTSD. 

“Health care workers were not adequately supported by the civil population and governments. They were forced to measure themselves against a disease that was risky for their own health. These specific populations, after one year of the pandemic, are affected by a continuous re-experiencing of the traumatic event, as during the first wave,” said Russo. 

Lisa Wolf, the director of emergency nursing research at the Emergency Nurses Association, has worked in nursing for over 25 years, but says nurses felt betrayed by their health care institutions with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“We’ve been through all kinds of things, like SARS, and AIDS, but we always felt the institutions we worked for were committed to keeping up as safe as possible. But in this pandemic the lack of response from the government and institutions created this anxiety among health care workers I’ve never seen. No one is sure who to trust and no one is sure what information is good,” said Wolf. 

Wolf recalled an event from last April, when a team of seven night-shift emergency nurses at an emergency room at Sinai-Grace Hospital of Detroit Medical Center were instructed to oversee 130 critically ill patients. 

“There would have been nurses that had to watch up to 20 patients at a time, which is not safe,” said one of the emergency room nurses Salah Hadwan in an interview with the Detroit Free Press. 

The team led a sit-in at the break room, refusing to work until the hospital was able to provide more staffing and resources. Yet, the resources never came, and the hospital ordered the emergency nurses to go home. 

“I think the real challenge for emergency nurses is that there is no time to process,” said Wolf. 

Last September, Wolf and her team investigated the levels of traumatic stress among emergency nurses in a study titled, “Does your work environment feel like a war zone?” 

“I was told stories of nurses committing suicide in the hospital bathrooms…I don’t think people understood how deep and prevalent trauma was until we did this study,” said Wolf. 

Her current study uses language from emergency nurses and the secondary traumatic stress scale. 

“We looked at Twitter as a data set, using search phrases like “get us PPE, and get me PPE,” to try to link words and tweets to the secondary traumatic stress scale from people who are verbalizing some kind of trauma,” said Wolf. 

Wolf said there has been a, “mass exodus of nurses from the bedside,” as many emergency nurses have switched to nurse practitioner positions which do not require as much direct patient care. 

This is consistent with the Utah Health study, which recommends giving frontline workers alternative roles which could reduce anxiety, fear, and the sense of helplessness associated with becoming infected. 

“You could reorient a nurse into conducting portions of visits that are virtual only. Even if there is an in-person component, it would allow a person to continue to provide their expertise without having to come into contact with a person that will be more infected,” said Smith. 

For Wolf, providing more resources for frontline workers to cope with traumatic stress and build resilience is necessary to restore the trust between workers and health care institutions. 

“A lot of nursing organizations talk about self-care, but the recommendations are often individual solutions to what is a very systemic problem,” said Wolf. 

Wolf is incorporating the idea of trauma processing into the emergency nursing pediatrics course and residency training programs. That way newer nurses who have never experienced a traumatic event, such as witnessing a patient die, can learn from a veteran nurse with more coping experience. 

“We are weaving this idea that if you uncover and normalize the fact we all need to manage our stress, then perhaps we will see a decrease in dysfunctional behaviors,” said Wolf. 

Smith is working on a new study which will examine how engagement in social support prevents health care workers from developing PTSD over time, and informal ways for frontline workers to engage in friendships, family, and their communities to prevent burnout and stress. 

“Social connections and social support, it’s the most consistent and powerful predictor of recovery,” said Smith.

In The News

Health

Voting

Mental Health

Global Summit Leaders Aim to End Sexual Exploitation
Mental Health
Global Summit Leaders Aim to End Sexual Exploitation
July 21, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck

The Coalition to End Sexual Exploitation Online Global Summit, hosted by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, is holding a week-long event, July 20-24, that brings together professionals from sexual abuse and exploitation sectors to discuss how to connect, educate and solve the tangled web of... Read More

Device Taps Brain Waves to Help Paralyzed Man Communicate
Science
Device Taps Brain Waves to Help Paralyzed Man Communicate

In a medical first, researchers harnessed the brain waves of a paralyzed man unable to speak — and turned what he intended to say into sentences on a computer screen. It will take years of additional research but the study, reported Wednesday, marks an important step... Read More

Commerce Secretary Says Aging Population Will Hit US Like ‘Ton of Bricks’
Health
Commerce Secretary Says Aging Population Will Hit US Like ‘Ton of Bricks’
July 14, 2021
by TWN Staff

Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said Monday that the United States’ aging population will hit the economy “like a ton of bricks” without increased federal aid for at-home elder and disabled care. Raimondo made the comments during an interview with Reuters, in which she also said President... Read More

Chronic Stress Can Wreak Havoc on Your Mind and Body
Mental Health
Chronic Stress Can Wreak Havoc on Your Mind and Body
July 14, 2021
by TWN Staff

Feeling constantly under attack? According to a new report on the Mayo Clinic website, it may just be a case of your body naturally treating minor hassles as full-blown threats. But you don’t have to let stress control your life, author Dana Sparks says. When you... Read More

Pandemic Reawakens Trauma for Those Living with HIV
Mental Health
Pandemic Reawakens Trauma for Those Living with HIV
July 14, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck

The impact of COVID-19 has been traumatic for many, but for those living with HIV the pandemic may have reawakened feelings of social exclusion and fear with receiving a positive status.  “I'm an HIV positive person and I just survived COVID-19 infection. We positive folks can... Read More

House Rules Committee to Host Roundtable on Hunger Crisis
Hunger
House Rules Committee to Host Roundtable on Hunger Crisis
July 13, 2021
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The House Rules Committee will hold a roundtable examining local innovations in combating hunger on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. The event is the fifth in a series of committee events highlighting the reality of food insecurity in America and examining the steps Congress and... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top