Capitol Hill Bomb Threat Suspect Faces Weapons of Mass Destruction Charge

August 20, 2021 by Dan McCue
A person is apprehended after being in a pickup truck parked on the sidewalk in front of the Library of Congress' Thomas Jefferson Building, as seen from a window of the U.S. Capitol, Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

WASHINGTON — Floyd Ray Roseberry, the North Carolina man who engaged in an hours-long standoff with police in front of the Library of Congress Thursday afternoon, is now facing a federal weapons of mass destruction charge.

Roseberry learned of the charges against him during a brief virtual appearance before U.S. Magistrate Judge Zia Faruqui Friday afternoon.

They include threats or attempted use of a weapon of mass destruction — for which he could receive a sentence of life in prison — and use or attempted use of an explosive device — which could net him up to 10 years in prison.

Roseberry surrendered to authorities Thursday afternoon after a five-hour standoff that saw the library and U.S. Capitol placed on lockdown and several nearby buildings evacuated. Capitol Police later said they found no bomb in Roseberry’s truck, but did find “possible bomb making materials.” 

Judge Faruqui appointed David Bos, with the Office of the Federal Public Defender, to represent the North Carolinian, who said he is 51 years old despite authorities saying he is 49. He also ordered that Roseberry undergo a competency evaluation ahead of his next court appearance, currently scheduled for Aug. 25.

Roseberry said little during Friday’s hearing, telling the judge he had gone two days without his medication, including something he called “mind medicine.” He also told Faruqui he wasn’t sure he could follow the proceedings.

Still unknown is the motive behind Roseberry’s actions on Thursday. Law enforcement officials said they had no indication he acted with anyone else, and said they had learned from interviews with family members that his mother had recently died and that there were other unspecified “issues he was dealing with.”

During the standoff, Roseberry live streamed himself via Facebook, mostly making rambling comments about President Joe Biden and Democrats, and calling himself a patriot and saying he was part of a revolution.

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