Mayo Clinic Seeks to Put Spotlight on Heart Health

March 9, 2023 by Dan McCue
Mayo Clinic Seeks to Put Spotlight on Heart Health
Screen grab from new video courtesy the Mayo Clinic News Network.

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease, killing 382,820 people in 2020, and about 20.1 million adults aged 20 and older have CAD (about 7.2%) according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This week, the Mayo Clinic is highlighting the issue with a video in its Mayo Clinic Minute series on the signs of coronary artery disease and how one can reduce their risk.

The clinic notes that the most common symptom of coronary artery disease is chest discomfort caused by the buildup of cholesterol that hardens and narrows the path the blood needs to traverse to get to the heart.

“It lasts a few minutes, or several minutes, and is felt by patients. They describe that discomfort as a pressure,” says Dr. Regis Fernandes, of the Mayo Clinic, in the video.

The clinic News Network’s Alex Osiadacz goes on to explain that once the discomfort becomes chronic, it is known as “angina” and is typically felt whenever the individual dealing with it exerts themselves.

The risk, of course, is that over time the disease will weaken the heart muscle and lead to heart failure.

How can one reduce their risk of coronary artery disease?

According to Fernandes, the best prevention is “eating properly, exercising and having good health habits.”

For those with a family history of heart disease, Fernandes recommends taking the extra step of monitoring one’s cholesterol levels — even if you’re presently feeling pretty good.

“It’s important to know your cholesterol levels, particularly in individuals that have a strong family history of heart disease,” Fernandes said. “Even though they are healthy, and they are practicing healthy habits, because it can also come in a genetic form.”

Dan can be reached at [email protected] and at https://twitter.com/DanMcCue

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  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • coronary heart disease
  • heart disease
  • Mayo Clinic
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