Loading...

House Panel Advances Bipartisan Plan to List PFAS Chemicals on Toxics Inventory

October 11, 2019 by Dan McCue
House Panel Advances Bipartisan Plan to List PFAS Chemicals on Toxics Inventory

WASHINGTON – A House subcommittee has advanced bipartisan legislation sponsored by Rep. Antonio Delgado, D-N.Y., that would require the EPA to list a dangerous class of compounds known as PFAS chemicals on its Toxics Release Inventory.

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, also known as PFAS chemicals, which are found in a number of industrial and household products, ranging from non-stick pans to firefighting foam.

A number of studies have linked PFAS chemicals to birth defects, infertility, developmental delays and some cancers.

The House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change endorsed The PFAS Right-to-Know Act just before the start of the congressional recess.

It would require certain manufacturers, processors, and producers to report their usage of PFAS chemicals to the EPA, which would then be publicly available in accordance with the Emergency Planning Community Right to Know Act.

“Our upstate communities of Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh continue to live with the effects of PFAS contamination, and we must understand where these chemicals are being used to identify potentially contaminated sites, hold emitters accountable, and protect our drinking water.” Delgado said.

“I am pleased to see the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment advance this bipartisan legislation that will take important steps to ensure all Americans are protected from these harmful chemicals, and I will continue to fight to bring this legislation to the House floor for a vote,” the New York congressman added.

Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act created the Toxics Release Inventory Program at the EPA.

This inventory tracks the use and management of toxic chemicals capable of threatening human health and the environment. Facilities in various industry sectors are required to report annually how much of each chemical included in the inventory is being released to the environment.

This reporting system supports informed decision-making by companies, government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and the public.

H.R. 2577, The PFAS Right-To-Know Act would create a 34th chemical class that industrial facilities with over 10 employees who exceed a certain threshold of PFAS yearly, would need to report to the EPA.

Delgado has made addressing PFAS contamination in his upstate New York district a priority since taking his seat in Congress in January.

Earlier this year, the representative urged the EPA to set maximum contaminant levels for PFAS chemicals as well as enact additional provisions to address water contamination in Upstate New York and across the country.

Instead of setting these maximum contaminant levels, the EPA only announced plans to begin doing so by the end of the year.

Last month, Delgado reiterated his request of the EPA to set a Maximum Contaminant Level for PFAS chemicals during testimony before the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee.

In The News

Health

Voting

Health

January 27, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
Federal Efforts Aim to Combat ‘Silent Pandemic’ of Antimicrobial Resistance  

WASHINGTON — A recent study published in the Lancet is the first to provide estimates that the global death toll... Read More

WASHINGTON — A recent study published in the Lancet is the first to provide estimates that the global death toll from antimicrobial resistance is greater than that of HIV or malaria. “It was our role to provide the most comprehensive results available for these [global health]... Read More

January 26, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
EPA and WHO Sign Memorandum With New Actions to Protect Human Health

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization recently signed a five-year Memorandum of Understanding with new actions for protecting human health... Read More

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization recently signed a five-year Memorandum of Understanding with new actions for protecting human health and the environment. “The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the intimate links between humans and our environment,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general, in a written statement. ... Read More

January 26, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
Black Patients With Dementia More Likely to Receive Aggressive Care in Nursing Homes 

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that Black nursing home residents with advanced dementia likely receive more aggressive care... Read More

A recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine shows that Black nursing home residents with advanced dementia likely receive more aggressive care than non-Black residents.  A team of researchers from Massachusetts, Tennessee, Georgia and North Carolina conducted the qualitative study with 169 staff interviews in 14 nursing homes... Read More

January 26, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
UCSD Offers Magnetic Stimulation for Patients With Treatment-Resistant Depression 

The University of California San Diego Health now offers a new treatment for patients with treatment-resistant depression, called transcranial magnetic stimulation.... Read More

The University of California San Diego Health now offers a new treatment for patients with treatment-resistant depression, called transcranial magnetic stimulation. TMS is a treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to stimulate nerve cells in areas of the brain associated with major depression. The... Read More

January 26, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
Rhode Island Delays Enforcement of Law to Increase Staffing in Nursing Homes 

In Rhode Island, Gov. Dan McKee recently signed an executive order to halt the enforcement of the Nursing Home Staffing and Quality Care... Read More

In Rhode Island, Gov. Dan McKee recently signed an executive order to halt the enforcement of the Nursing Home Staffing and Quality Care Act, which he signed into law last May to give nursing homes across the state a higher staff-to-patient ratio.  The Nursing Home Staffing and Quality Care... Read More

January 26, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
Yale Researchers Develop a Fresh Air Clip Capable of Detecting Virus 

Researchers from the Yale School of Public Health recently developed a small, lightweight, inexpensive wearable device — the Fresh Air Clip —... Read More

Researchers from the Yale School of Public Health recently developed a small, lightweight, inexpensive wearable device — the Fresh Air Clip — that is capable of detecting possible exposure to SARS-CoV-2. The clip was developed to help individuals in high-risk settings to detect low levels of virus and... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version