As Physician Shortage Looms, Team-Based Care May Help

September 19, 2022 by Eden Metzger
As Physician Shortage Looms, Team-Based Care May Help
(National Cancer Institute photo via UnSplash)

CHICAGO — The warnings have become all too common — by 2025, many authorities agree, the U.S. is going to face a shortage of physicians.

In fact, between September 2022 and 2034, there are likely to be as many as 124,000 fewer practicing physicians in the U.S., and 48,000 fewer primary care physicians.

However, a recent article from the American Medical Association suggests one way to mitigate the impact of this shortage when it comes to patient care may be a greater reliance on so-called “team-based care.”

In such cases, patients receive care from a physician leader overseeing a multidisciplinary team of primary care and specialty physicians, non-physician clinical staff such as nurses and pharmacists, as well as non-clinical staff.


The AMA defines team-based care as “the consistent use by a physician of the leadership knowledge, skills, and expertise necessary to identify, engage and elicit from each team member the unique set of training, experience, and qualifications needed to help patients achieve their care goals, and to supervise the application of these skills.” 

The article, written by AMA senior news writer Andis Robeznieks, focuses on the thoughts and experiences of Dr. Kimberly Herner, chief quality officer for Valley Medical Center, which is part of UW Medicine, the University of Washington health system.

According to Herner, the impending physician shortage is going to force the medical community into “a different way of doing business.”


“It is unfortunate that there likely will be a physician shortage, so we’re going to have to do things differently if we want to help our patients stay healthy and manage their health issues,” she told Robeznieks.

“I’m biased, as I feel that everyone should have a primary care physician, but there’s not enough to go around, so how can we extend their capacity?” Herner added. “Having a team means I don’t have to see everybody every time. I could have them see my team members sometimes.”

Herner goes on to explain the reason Valley Medical Center’s clinic has been successful with team care is because they’ve created a precise set of steps that have been perfected over time. 

These steps include, “Patient education and engagement; risk stratification of patients and creating care pathways with well-defined roles for each member of the team.”

The first step is building a relationship with the patient and creating a safe space for learning. Herner explains that educating patients on what their diagnoses mean and how they can routinely check their oxygen saturation, blood pressure and weight, etc. are helpful tools when managing health care.

The next step is getting patients in touch with a specialized physician. In the case of diabetes, Herner explains that “we created a pathway where, if certain conditions exist, we consider referral to an endocrinologist. Then, once these conditions are addressed, we send them back to their regular doctor.”


Finally, data is collected and used to make sure that pathways are completed.

Eden can be reached at [email protected]

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Health

Abortion Rights Groups Look to Next Fights After 2022 Wins

CHICAGO (AP) — Emboldened by the results of November's midterms, abortion rights supporters say they are preparing for even bigger fights... Read More

CHICAGO (AP) — Emboldened by the results of November's midterms, abortion rights supporters say they are preparing for even bigger fights in state legislatures and pivotal elections to come, including 2024 races for Congress and president. Victories for abortion rights ballot measures and candidates who support abortion provided a... Read More

November 30, 2022
by Dan McCue
GOP Senators Oppose Advancing NDAA Unless Military Vaccine Mandate Canned

WASHINGTON — A group of U.S. senators led by Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said they will... Read More

WASHINGTON — A group of U.S. senators led by Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said they will oppose passage of this year’s defense spending authorization unless the chamber votes to repeal the current COVID-19 vaccine mandate for military personnel. In a letter to... Read More

November 30, 2022
by Dan McCue
Initiative Makes $350M Available to Increase COVID-19 Vaccinations

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is making $350 million available to increase COVID-19 vaccinations at Health Resources and Services Administration-supported... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration is making $350 million available to increase COVID-19 vaccinations at Health Resources and Services Administration-supported health facilities. The funding will support health centers administering updated COVID-19 vaccines through mobile, drive-up, walk-up or community-based vaccination events, including working with community-based organizations and... Read More

November 30, 2022
by Dan McCue
WHO Recommends New Name for Monkeypox Disease

GENEVA — The World Health Organization has begun using the term “mpox” as the preferred synonym for monkeypox. Both names... Read More

GENEVA — The World Health Organization has begun using the term “mpox” as the preferred synonym for monkeypox. Both names will be used simultaneously for one year while “monkeypox” is phased out, the organization said. According to the WHO, when the current outbreak of monkeypox began... Read More

November 30, 2022
by Dan McCue
WHO Urges More Effective Prevention of Injuries and Violence

GENEVA —The statistics are sobering. One in 12 deaths worldwide are caused by some form of injury and/or violence, and... Read More

GENEVA —The statistics are sobering. One in 12 deaths worldwide are caused by some form of injury and/or violence, and when all those deaths are tallied, the outcome shows that traffic accidents, drownings, falls, burns and suicides are taking the lives of some 12,000 people a... Read More

November 30, 2022
by TWN Staff
New Study Challenges ‘Good’ Cholesterol’s Role in Predicting Heart Disease Risk

BETHESDA, Md. — A new study has found that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the so-called "good cholesterol," may not be as... Read More

BETHESDA, Md. — A new study has found that high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the so-called "good cholesterol," may not be as effective as scientists once believed in uniformly predicting cardiovascular disease risk among adults of different racial and ethnic backgrounds.  In fact, the research, which was supported... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top