Emhoff to Join Faculty of Georgetown Law

December 10, 2020 by Dan McCue
Vice President-elect Kamala Harris listens as her husband Doug Emhoff speaks during a visit to DC Central Kitchen, Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

WASHINGTON – Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, will be joining Georgetown Law beginning in January.

The nation’s very first “Second Gentleman”  and an entertainment lawyer by profession, will serve as a distinguished visitor from practice and teach a two-credit course in the spring semester called “Entertainment Law Disputes.”

He will also serve as a distinguished fellow of Georgetown Law’s Institute for Technology Law and Policy. That’s part of a new entertainment and media law initiative for the school that will include a speaker series and other projects.

“I am delighted that Douglas Emhoff will be joining our faculty,” said Georgetown Law Dean William Treanor.

“Doug is one of the nation’s leading intellectual property and business litigators, and he has a strong commitment to social justice. I know our students will greatly benefit from his experience and insight, and I am eagerly looking forward to his arrival,” Treanor said.

Emhoff  had planned to leave his private law practice by Inauguration Day to focus on his White House duties as the second gentleman.

He had said he wanted to avoid appearances of conflicts of interest because his firm, DLA Piper, has a lobbying presence in Washington.

The Biden-Harris transition team said Emhoff’s role at Georgetown will be separate from his role as second gentleman and that he is working to develop a portfolio to support the work of the administration.

However, of his new role, Emhoff said, “I’ve long wanted to teach and serve the next generation of young lawyers.”

“I couldn’t be more excited to join the Georgetown community,” he added.

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