facebook linkedin twitter

Lawmakers Defer Some Jan. 6 Document Requests, Seek Others

October 26, 2021by Zeke Miller and Mary Clare Jalonick, Associated Press
Lawmakers Defer Some Jan. 6 Document Requests, Seek Others
In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, supporters of then President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol “deferred” its requests for several dozen pages of records from former President Donald Trump’s administration at the White House’s urging, but President Joe Biden again rejected the former president’s invocation of executive privilege on hundreds of additional pages.

In a letter to the National Archives and Records Administration, Biden counsel Dana Remus repeated that the president has “determined that an assertion of executive privilege is not in the best interests of the United States, and therefore is not justified” for two tranches of documents sent to the White House for review last month.

The panel is investigating the violent Capitol siege by Trump’s supporters that day and has sought documents connected to the former president, who has falsely said he won the presidential election and that morning urged his crowd of followers to “fight like hell.” 

Obtained Monday by The Associated Press, the letter from Remus reveals that the committee “deferred” its request for nearly 50 pages of documents as a result of an “accommodation” process with the Biden White House. That process allows the White House to protect some records that may be privileged without formally blocking their release.


The letter from Remus came two weeks after the White House said it would not block an earlier, more sweeping tranche of documents after Trump sought to shield them. Biden has made clear that he does not want to block the committee’s work, and Remus wrote in both letters that the documents could “shed light on events within the White House on and about January 6 and bear on the Select Committee’s need to understand the facts underlying the most serious attack on the operations of the Federal Government since the Civil War.”


Still, the White House’s desire to shield some documents shows that the process of approving releases to the Jan. 6 committee won’t always be simple, as presidents have long relied on their ability to assert executive privilege to protect their internal communications and deliberations. Biden’s decisions to release certain documents could set precedents for future administrations and could eventually apply to his own records when he is out of office.

In a statement, a spokesman for the Jan. 6 panel said that lawmakers welcomed Biden’s decision to allow the production of the two additional sets of records and that the committee had agreed to “defer action” on certain records.

“The Select Committee has not withdrawn its request for those records and will continue to engage with the executive branch to ensure we get access to all the information relevant to our probe,” said spokesman Tim Mulvey.

Even though Biden has approved the release of most of the documents, their ultimate fate will now be decided by the courts. Trump filed suit earlier this month to try to block the archives from releasing his records.


In the lawsuit, Trump called the document requests a “vexatious, illegal fishing expedition” that was “untethered from any legitimate legislative purpose,” according to the papers filed in federal court in the District of Columbia.

The former president’s lawyer has also sought to block testimony from some of his former aides, including longtime ally Steve Bannon. The House voted to hold Bannon in contempt last week after he defied the panel’s subpoena and his lawyer said that Trump would assert privilege over his testimony.

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Congress

May 25, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Assurances on Resolving Baby Formula Shortage Met With Suspicion in Congress

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday were skeptical of assurances by government regulators and manufacturers that they can... Read More

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday were skeptical of assurances by government regulators and manufacturers that they can resolve the nation’s shortage of baby formula promptly. They described the problems they observed as part of a bigger trend that requires long-term solutions. “This presents... Read More

May 25, 2022
by Dan McCue
Sergeant-at-Arms: Capitol Complex Should Largely Be Gun-Free Zone

WASHINGTON — Loaded firearms have no place in the U.S. Capitol or on its grounds, unless they are in the... Read More

WASHINGTON — Loaded firearms have no place in the U.S. Capitol or on its grounds, unless they are in the hands of trained and authorized law enforcement personnel, the House sergeant-at-arms said on Wednesday. William J. Walker’s unambiguous statement came in a letter to House Majority... Read More

May 25, 2022
by Dan McCue
4th Circuit Rules Civil War Era Amnesty Rule Does Not Apply to Later Insurrectionists

RICHMOND, Va. — A federal appeals court has ruled that the protections inscribed in an amnesty law passed in the... Read More

RICHMOND, Va. — A federal appeals court has ruled that the protections inscribed in an amnesty law passed in the aftermath of the Civil War do not apply to other insurrectionists. Tuesday’s ruling by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the limits of the... Read More

May 24, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Congress Wants to Reduce Barriers to Success for the Disabled

WASHINGTON — A congressional panel sought answers Tuesday for how to help the disabled evade the stereotypes, abuse and depression... Read More

WASHINGTON — A congressional panel sought answers Tuesday for how to help the disabled evade the stereotypes, abuse and depression that often push them into persistent failure. “They’re forgotten or they're an afterthought,” said Rep. Sylvia Garcia, D-Texas, who formerly worked as a lawyer representing disabled... Read More

May 23, 2022
by Dan McCue
House Panel to Investigate Cawthorn Tie to Crypto, Alleged Relationship With Staffer

WASHINGTON — The House Ethics Committee announced Monday that it has begun an investigation into allegations Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C.,... Read More

WASHINGTON — The House Ethics Committee announced Monday that it has begun an investigation into allegations Rep. Madison Cawthorn, R-N.C., improperly promoted a cryptocurrency and engaged in an “inappropriate relationship” with a member of his staff. The committee did not elaborate on the allegations.  In a... Read More

May 19, 2022
by Dan McCue
New Dems Push Commerce to Speed Solar Tariff Investigation

WASHINGTON — Members of the New Democrat Coalition on Thursday urged the Commerce Department to step up the pace of... Read More

WASHINGTON — Members of the New Democrat Coalition on Thursday urged the Commerce Department to step up the pace of its two-month-old investigation of solar technology imports. The development of hundreds of large-scale solar farms are on hold across the United States as the industry and... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top