Census Bureau: Six States to Gain House Seats, Seven Lose One

April 26, 2021 by Dan McCue
The U.S. Capitol. (Photo by Dan McCue)

Six states will see their congressional delegations grow in the next Congress, officials with the U.S. Census Bureau announced Monday.

Dr. Ron S. Jarmin, the bureau’s acting director, said as of April 1, 2020, the number of people living in the United States was 331,449,281, a 7.4% increase over the official population count from the 2010 census.

That was the second slowest U.S. growth rate recorded in the history of the once-a-decade count, he said.

Despite that, the long-running trend of the South and the West gaining population, and Congressional representation, at the expense of the Northeast and the Midwest, continued.

The South saw a 10.2% increase in population over the past decade, followed by the West, with an increase of 9.2%. The Northeast saw a 4.1% increase in population over the past 10 years, but the Midwest grew by only 3.1%. 

Monday’s announcement of the numbers coincided with the Census Bureau delivering the results to the president, a ritual that has occurred only 23 other times in U.S. history.

Once the bureau delivers the census to the White House — along with assurances that it is complete and accurate, the president turns the population counts and apportionment results over to Congress.

However, the Census Bureau’s work is not done: It still has to deliver the redistricting data to the states, something officials said would be done no later than September 30.

The Census Bureau adopted its current formula for the apportionment in 1941. Since then, there has been a combined net shift of 84 House seats to the South and West. This year, Jarmin said, saw the smallest number of seats shifting among the states in 80 years, with a shift of just seven seats among 13 states.

Texas is set to add two U.S. House seats to its delegation after a decade in which the state added more than 4 million new residents, the bureau’s technical experts said.

Colorado, North Carolina, Florida, Montana and Oregon will each add one more seat. 

States losing seats are almost all in the highly contested Rust Belt.

These include Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. 

One of the regional outliers among the states losing a seat is New York, which bureau officials said came within just 89 people of retaining all of its seats.

The other state losing one congressional district is California, which hasn’t seen a decline in the number of its delegation members since 1850, the year it joined the union.

The data announced Monday will be used to reapportion seats in Congress, and, in turn, the Electoral College, based on new state population counts.

The count is also critical for allocating billions of dollars in federal funding as well as state and local planning around everything from schools to housing to hospitals.

The states they’ll have the most representatives in the next Congress are California with 52 seats, Texas 38 seats, Florida with 28 seats, and New York with 26 seats.

In The News

Health

Voting

Congress

Agreement Eludes Senators On Election Reform Proposal
Congress
Agreement Eludes Senators On Election Reform Proposal
May 12, 2021
by Tom Ramstack

WASHINGTON -- A Senate committee tried Tuesday to amend a bill before sending it off to a final vote that would set national standards for elections. It made little headway in reaching agreement in a sharply divided Senate Rules and Administration Committee. Republicans said it was... Read More

Democrats Press for Broader Voter Access as GOP Resists
Congress
Democrats Press for Broader Voter Access as GOP Resists

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans in the U.S. Senate mounted an aggressive case against Democrats' sweeping election and voter-access legislation, pushing to roll back proposals for automatic registration, 24-hour ballot drop boxes and other changes in an increasingly charged national debate. The legislation, a top priority of... Read More

GOP Votes to Oust Trump Critic Cheney from Leadership Post
Congress
GOP Votes to Oust Trump Critic Cheney from Leadership Post

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans ousted Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership post after she repeatedly rebuked former President Donald Trump for his false claims of election fraud and his role in fomenting the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol attack. The closed-door, secret-ballot vote to oust the... Read More

Trump Administration Officials to Testify on Jan. 6 Riot
Congress
Trump Administration Officials to Testify on Jan. 6 Riot

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two senior Trump administration officials plan to defend their actions during the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol when they appear before Congress, with former acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller standing behind every decision he made that day. Miller will tell the... Read More

GOP Readies Blitz Against Democrats' Voting Rights Bill
Congress
GOP Readies Blitz Against Democrats' Voting Rights Bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are preparing to launch an all-out assault on sweeping voting rights legislation, forcing Democrats to take dozens of politically difficult votes during a committee hearing that will spotlight the increasingly charged national debate over access to the ballot. The bill, as written,... Read More

Blue Dogs Tap LaVigne to Serve as new Executive Director
In The News
Blue Dogs Tap LaVigne to Serve as new Executive Director
May 10, 2021
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The Blue Dog Coalition has hired Andy LaVigne to serve as its executive director. LaVigne previously served as the political director for the International Association of Fire Fighters. He will work alongside Brooke Lillard, who has served as the Coalition’s communications director over the... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top