“I Have a Plan for That.” Elizabeth Warren’s Quest to Tackle America’s Challenges

June 21, 2019 by TWN Staff
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) waves to the audience during the Black Economic Alliance Forum on June 15, 2019 in Charleston, S.C. The Black Economic Alliance is a nonpartisan group founded by black executives and business leaders, and is hosting the forum in order to help black voters understand candidate's platforms. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images/TNS)

Candidate: Elizabeth Warren

State of Residence: Massachusetts

Campaign Website: https://elizabethwarren.com

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) waves to the audience during the Black Economic Alliance Forum on June 15, 2019 in Charleston, S.C. The Black Economic Alliance is a nonpartisan group founded by black executives and business leaders, and is hosting the forum in order to help black voters understand candidate’s platforms. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images/TNS)

 

Short Bio: Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts like to say she’s made her life’s work the fight for middle class families.

Before becoming the first woman ever elected to the Senate from Massachusetts in 2012 (she was re-elected to the Senate for a second term on November 6, 2018), Warren served as chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) — the oversight board set up in the aftermath of the financial crisis to protect taxpayers, hold Wall Street accountable, and help homeowners get back on their feet.

She is widely credited for the original thinking, political courage, and relentless persistence that led to the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which she helped stand up and has successfully protected millions of consumers from financial tricks and traps often hidden in mortgages, credit cards, and other financial products.

As a law professor for more than 30 years, Warren taught courses on commercial law, contracts, and bankruptcy. She has written more than a hundred articles and eleven books, including four national best-sellers, This Fight Is Our Fight, A Fighting Chance, The Two-Income Trap, and All Your Worth.

Warren learned first-hand about the economic pressures facing working families, growing up in a family she says was “on the ragged edge of the middle class.” She got married at 19, and after graduating from college, started teaching in elementary school. Her first child, a daughter Amelia, was born when Warren was 22. When Amelia was two, Warren started law school. Shortly after she graduated, her son Alex was born. Warren hung out a shingle and practiced law out of her living room, but she soon returned to teaching.

Warren is a graduate of the University of Houston and Rutgers School of Law. She and her husband Bruce Mann have been married for 39 years and live in Cambridge, Massachusetts with their golden retriever, Bailey. They have three grandchildren. [Official Senate Bio]

Fun Fact: She was a state debate champion in Oklahoma and graduated high school at 16. [Axios]

On the Issues

Health Care: Supports the “Medicare for All” bill led by Bernie Sanders. Warren, a staunch supporter of the Affordable Care Act, has also advocated for further action to ease health care costs and slash drug prices. In 2018, she proposed limiting insurer profits while expanding health care subsidies and tax credits. She also supported the “Medicare for All” bill spearheaded by Sanders, a potential 2020 rival, and called that approach “a goal worth fighting for.” [PBS]

Trade & Agriculture: Supports renegotiating NAFTA. Opposes President Donald Trump’s trade policies. Warren is a critic of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA, and blames U.S. trade policy more generally for widening economic inequality in the country.

While she favors renegotiating NAFTA, she argues the deal Trump struck with Canada and Mexico in 2018 will have few benefits for American workers. The new agreement has yet to be ratified by Congress. Warren has called Trump’s economic policies “beyond inept,” and has argued that the Trump administration’s tariffs are hurting U.S. farms and businesses. [PBS]

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