Federal Officials Say No Major Problems Reported In Early Voting

November 3, 2020 by Dan McCue
Election workers prepare to register voters on Election Day at a polling place inside the Bartow Community Center, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 2020, in the Bronx borough of New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

WASHINGTON – Federal officials monitoring voting and threats to the 2020 election said they’ve seen no major problems, but they continue to urge the public to be both watchful and patient as they head to the polls.

All told, the U.S. Justice Department has deployed personnel to 44 jurisdictions in 18 states, in order to enforce “federal voting rights laws” and “protect the rights of all citizens to access the ballot.”

Meanwhile, in an operations center just outside Washington, D.C., cyber-security officials with the Department of Homeland Security said while there was “some early indication of system disruption” the agency has confidence the vote has been unaffected.

“The count is secure and the results will be secure,” said U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency director Christopher Krebs early Tuesday.

Krebs said officials have seen attempts by foreign actors to interfere in the 2020 election, but he said those threats were “addressed quickly … and comprehensively.”

Krebs also urged all Americans “to treat all sensational and unverified claims with skepticism and remember technology sometimes fails.”

As for the DOJ, the states it is monitoring today are Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

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