Justices Won’t Review Case Involving Couple Who Waved Guns at Protesters

June 6, 2022 by Dan McCue
Justices Won’t Review Case Involving Couple Who Waved Guns at Protesters
Armed homeowners Mark and Patricia McCloskey, standing in front their house confront protesters marching to St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson's house in the Central West End of St. Louis, Mo. (Laurie Skrivan/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP, File)

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court declined on Monday to take up a case brought by a Missouri couple who rose to public attention after they waved guns at Black Lives Matter protesters in the wake of George Floyd’s murder in June 2020.

Mark McCloskey, who is now a Republican Senate candidate, and his wife Patricia petitioned the high court to review a professional disciplinary action handed down against them by the Missouri Supreme Court earlier this year.

In February, the court ruled that as a result of their actions in the face of the protest against racial injustice, the couple should have their law licenses suspended.

However, the court then stayed the suspension and put them each on probation for a year, warning them that if they broke any additional laws, the suspension would take effect immediately.


After the court’s decision was announced, McCloskey told the Associated Press he was disappointed by the ruling, but also happy the court chose to put the couple on probation, rather than suspend their licenses immediately.

He went on to say he never dreamed he and his wife would be accused of moral turpitude “for doing what we thought was right.”

“I think the reason why we were asked to be suspended had more to do with politics than anything else,” McCloskey said. “But we respect the court’s opinion, although we disagree … We will comply 100% with the orders.”


The couple then petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for a grant of certiorari.

As is their custom the justices did not explain their rationale for not taking up the case. There were no noted dissents that might have shed some light on their reasoning.

The McCloskeys made national headlines in 2020 when they brandished weapons in front of their home as Black Lives Matter protestors marched down their private street.

At the time, they said, they feared for their lives.

Mark McCloskey later pleaded guilty to misdemeanor fourth-degree assault and was ordered to pay a $750 fine. Patricia McCloskey pleaded guilty to misdemeanor harassment and was ordered to pay a $2,000 fine.


Missouri Gov. Mike Parsons pardoned them last year.

Dan can be reached at [email protected] and at https://twitter.com/DanMcCue.

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