facebook linkedin twitter

D.C.’s Small COVID-19 Funding Renews Calls for Statehood

April 13, 2020 by Tom Ramstack

WASHINGTON — Legislation approved by Congress recently to distribute emergency coronavirus funding nationwide is renewing calls for District of Columbia statehood.

Each state will receive at least $1.25 billion from the emergency fund lawmakers approved two weeks ago. The District of Columbia is receiving $500 million, despite having a population bigger than Vermont and Wyoming.

Local residents also pay more in federal taxes per capita than most states. 

Washington, D.C. was lumped in with five territories to split $3 billion of the CARES Act funding. The money will be shared with Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands and American Samoa.

Mayor Muriel Bowser says the funding formula shows how local concerns get overlooked because of the District of Columbia’s lack of voting representatives in Congress.

“I have to say, the very idea of being treated like a territory is shocking, infuriating, wrong and outrageous,” Bowser said during a press conference.

She made the statement as the Washington area started to emerge as a national coronavirus hotspot with a quickly growing rate of infections and deaths. More than 2,000 Americans were dying daily by April 11, pushing the death toll to the world’s highest.

The $2 trillion stimulus package signed by President Donald Trump is supposed to rescue the economy from the shutdown and devastation caused by the pandemic. It will provide millions of Americans with cash payments and distribute billions of dollars to states and municipalities.

Proposals for the stimulus funding started in the Senate, where the District has no representative. The House has a non-voting delegate representing the nation’s capital, but she was not allowed to speak during debate before the vote.

After the vote, Delegate Eleanor Holmes-Norton, Washington’s Democratic delegate to Congress, said the funding level for the District of Columbia shows why she is pushing so hard for statehood.

She also said the city’s population of more than 700,000 residents lives in closer proximity than most states, thereby increasing the risk of coronavirus infection and the need for emergency aid.

Until recently, proposals for D.C. statehood rarely moved outside the Beltway. A recent trend in Congress shows at least a moderate change of opinions.

“This is the latest example of why we must grant D.C. statehood,” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, a Maryland Democrat, said in a statement after Congress approved the stimulus package. “This failure to treat D.C. as a state must be fixed retroactively in the next bill to respond to the coronavirus.”

Democrats in the House of Representatives generally favor statehood while most Republicans in the Senate oppose it. Republicans control a majority in the Senate.

In a 2016 referendum, nearly 80 percent of residents supported statehood.

The House Oversight Committee approved a bill in February to grant the District of Columbia statehood. It had more than 200 co-sponsors.

The full House is scheduled to vote on the bill proposed by Holmes-Norton later this year. It is likely to be approved by Democrats who see an opportunity to add more members of their party to Congress from the heavily-Democratic District of Columbia.

It awaits further action in the Senate, where the majority leader has said it is unlikely to win approval.

In The News

Health

Voting

State News

April 22, 2021
by TWN Staff
New Caucus Aims to Bring Main Street Priorities to Capitol Hill

Eighteen members of Congress on Wednesday announced the formation of a new Congressional Caucus whose intent is to ensure that... Read More

Eighteen members of Congress on Wednesday announced the formation of a new Congressional Caucus whose intent is to ensure that the priorities and concerns of cities and counties across America are heard on Capitol Hill. The bipartisan Congressional Caucus of Former Local Elected Officials was formed... Read More

April 16, 2021
by TWN Staff
35 States at Extreme Risk of Partisan Gerrymandering

Thirty-five states are at extreme or high risk of partisan gerrymandering, according to an in-depth report by the nonpartisan RepresentUs... Read More

Thirty-five states are at extreme or high risk of partisan gerrymandering, according to an in-depth report by the nonpartisan RepresentUs organization. The Gerrymandering Threat Index rates all 50 states, and its authors argue their findings underscore the urgent need to pass the redistricting reforms within the... Read More

Plan Afoot to Extend PPP Deadline to May 31

WASHINGTON - A bipartisan bill to extend the Paycheck Protection Program to May 31 is gaining support in the House... Read More

WASHINGTON - A bipartisan bill to extend the Paycheck Protection Program to May 31 is gaining support in the House and the Senate and will likely be voted on before lawmakers head back to their districts at the end of the month. The proposal to extend... Read More

March 2, 2021
by TWN Staff
Cherry Blossom Peak Bloom Date Announced

WASHINGTON - It’s hard to believe it’s almost that time of year again, but on Monday came word that the... Read More

WASHINGTON - It’s hard to believe it’s almost that time of year again, but on Monday came word that the peak bloom for the cherry blossoms ringing the Tidal Basin in Washington is currently expected to occur April 2-5.  That means the most vivid of blooms... Read More

Once the Mainstream Model, Michigan GOP Embraces Right Wing

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Josh Venable, a longtime Michigan GOP operative and chief of staff to former U.S. Education Secretary... Read More

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Josh Venable, a longtime Michigan GOP operative and chief of staff to former U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, can trace the arc of the state's Republican Party clearly."This was the state where to be Republican was defined by Gerald Ford and George... Read More

What NY Prosecutors Could Learn from Trump's Tax Records

NEW YORK (AP) — Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. fought for a year and a half to get... Read More

NEW YORK (AP) — Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. fought for a year and a half to get access to former President Donald Trump's tax records.Now, thanks to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, he will soon have them. But what will that mean for... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top