Study Shows Major Mental Health Crisis in US Children and Teens

August 10, 2022 by Alexa Hornbeck
Study Shows Major Mental Health Crisis in US Children and Teens
(Dmitry Volochek/Dreamstime/TNS)

During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic children across the U.S. experienced high levels of anxiety and depression. A report released on Aug. 8 from the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlights the issue.

According to the report, the number of children across the country aged 3-17 who experienced anxiety or depression jumped 26% between 2016 and 2020. 

The increase represents 1.5 million more children who are struggling with mental health issues since the start of the pandemic. 

Even prior to the pandemic, in 2019, the report finds that 9% of high schoolers attempted suicide. 

The study was conducted using data from the National Survey of Children’s Health, which is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau and measures economic well-being, health, education, family and community. 

The report recommends areas where the nation can continue to address the ongoing mental health crisis among youth. This includes ensuring that all children have access to the mental health care they need, and bolstering care that accounts for young people’s different experiences and identities. 

Alexa can be reached at [email protected]

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