Woodward Says Pentagon Gripped By ‘High Anxiety’ Over Trump

May 31, 2019 by Dan McCue
Journalist Bob Woodward is seen in the lobby of Trump Tower on Jan. 3, 2017 in New York, N.Y. (Albin Lohr-Jones/Sipa USA/TNS)

Legendary Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward says there’s a sense at the Pentagon that the military is the last institution in America that is working, and a real concern among members of the Joint Chiefs about what President Donald Trump might do next.

Woodward offered that assessment on the latest episode of “The Axe Files” with David Axelrod, a political podcast exclusively available on Luminary.

During an in-depth, hour-long interview, Woodward recounts a recent meeting of generals and admirals at the Pentagon at which the chairman of the Joint Chiefs opined that military is essentially the last American institution left standing today.

“I think there’s some truth to that,” Woodward said. “But the president is Commander in Chief. And, as we know, presidents can essentially start wars all on their own. So it’s a really important question: ‘What is the temperature everywhere?’ It’s high anxiety.”

The bestselling author and investigative journalist for The Washington Post also draws parallels between Nixon and Trump during the interview, telling Axelrod that “If you look at what Trump has done, you can draw a straight line from Nixon to Trump.

“We are at a pivot point in history about how we are going to deal with the legitimization of hate in American politics,” he said.

Luminary is a free podcast app and premium subscription content network, where Luminary Premium subscribers will have access to more than 40 podcasts – including, in addition to “The Axe Files,” “Fiasco with Leon Neyfakh,” “On Second Thought with Trevor Noah” and “Under The Skin with Russell Brand,” among many others.

For additional information, visit Luminary here.

Strained Rural Water Utilities Buckle Under Pandemic Pressure
In The News
Strained Rural Water Utilities Buckle Under Pandemic Pressure

WASHINGTON — The months leading up to the coronavirus pandemic already spelled trouble for the Rome Water System and the tiny community it serves in the Mississippi Delta. A tornado tossed around several homes, closed roads and left the community without power for two weeks. Lightning... Read More

More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain
In The News
More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain

WASHINGTON — More than ever, Eric Harris is mindful of the elected officials around him: The school board members deciding whether his children will go back to the classroom, the sheriff influencing how officers interact with people like him, and the U.S. president steering the country’s... Read More

Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic
In The News
Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic

WASHINGTON — Dave and Diane Schell, a retired social studies teacher and a retired human resources professional from South Windsor, Connecticut, left their careers in 2015, and have worked the polls at their local precinct every election since. But not this November. The Schells — he’s... Read More

Coronavirus, Trump Chill International Enrollment at US Colleges
Education
Coronavirus, Trump Chill International Enrollment at US Colleges

WASHINGTON — Chittawan Boonsitanon started junior year at Michigan State University last week from his home in Bangkok, 8,500 miles and half a world away. Boonsitanon said many international students decided months ago to take classes online, before Michigan State administrators in mid-August urged all undergraduates... Read More

Trump Administration’s Census Plan Might Leave Out Some Legal Residents
Census
Trump Administration’s Census Plan Might Leave Out Some Legal Residents

WASHINGTON — A Trump administration plan to use the census to exclude from congressional representation immigrants who are living here illegally might inadvertently exclude many U.S. citizens living under the radar in states such as Alaska, New Mexico and West Virginia. Last week, a federal appeals... Read More

Checking China’s Diplomatic Piracy in the South China Sea
Foreign Affairs
Checking China’s Diplomatic Piracy in the South China Sea
September 18, 2020
by Craig Singleton

China appears keen to bring piracy back as an instrument of foreign policy, but the days of eye patches and wooden legs are long gone. Instead, Beijing’s most effective raiding parties prefer business suits and briefcases, thus allowing them to ransack and plunder under the guise... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top