Biden to Boost Federal Employee Pay in 2022

August 27, 2021 by Dan McCue
The White House emblem in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room, Aug. 27 2021. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden formally unveiled plans on Friday to give civilian employees of the federal government a pay raise, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

In a letter to House and Senate leadership, Biden said the across-the-board base pay increase will be 2.2% and locality pay increases will average 0.5%, resulting in an overall average increase of 2.7% for civilian Federal employees.  

This is the first time the Biden administration has indicated its specific plans for locality-based pay adjustments. 

Previously, the White House recommended a 2.7% federal pay raise for civilian employees in its 2022 budget request, but it didn’t spell out how locality pay would fit into the equation.

An annual across-the-board pay adjustment formula in the Federal Employees Pay Comparability Act sets raises for most federal employees under the General Schedule, but as Biden did Friday, most presidents choose to go their own way in this regard.

Federal pay raises would go into effect during the first pay period in January. 

No pay adjustments for federal employees are official until the president signs an executive order formally implementing them, which usually occurs near the end of the calendar year.

White House

Crunch Time: Biden Faces Critical Next 2 Weeks for Agenda

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is entering a crucial two weeks for his ambitious agenda, racing to conclude contentious... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is entering a crucial two weeks for his ambitious agenda, racing to conclude contentious congressional negotiations ahead of both domestic deadlines and a chance to showcase his administration's accomplishments on a global stage.  Biden and his fellow Democrats are struggling... Read More

October 15, 2021
by Dan McCue
Supreme Court Commission Finds Crisis In Senate Confirmation Process

WASHINGTON -- A presidential panel charged with considering the pros and cons of altering the size and function of the... Read More

WASHINGTON -- A presidential panel charged with considering the pros and cons of altering the size and function of the U.S. Supreme Court is instead calling out the Senate confirmation process for justices. In draft documents released ahead of a public meeting on Friday, the Presidential... Read More

October 14, 2021
by Dan McCue
White House Action on Supply Chain Bottleneck Seen As First Step To Ending Crisis

WASHINGTON -- They’ve almost become as ubiquitous as scenes of weathermen and women leaning into the fierce winds of a... Read More

WASHINGTON -- They’ve almost become as ubiquitous as scenes of weathermen and women leaning into the fierce winds of a tropical storm during hurricane season. We refer, of course, to the daily television news footage of a reporter bobbing up and down in a decidedly modest... Read More

Border Residents Rejoice as US Says it Will Lift Travel Ban

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Beleaguered business owners and families separated by COVID-19 restrictions rejoiced Wednesday after the U.S. said it... Read More

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Beleaguered business owners and families separated by COVID-19 restrictions rejoiced Wednesday after the U.S. said it will reopen its land borders to nonessential travel next month, ending a 19-month freeze. Travel across land borders from Canada and Mexico has been largely restricted... Read More

October 13, 2021
by Dan McCue
Haaland Reveals Administration Plan for Massive Expansion of Offshore Wind

BOSTON, Mass. -- Interior Secretary Deb Haaland told attendees at a wind energy conference on Wednesday that the Biden administration... Read More

BOSTON, Mass. -- Interior Secretary Deb Haaland told attendees at a wind energy conference on Wednesday that the Biden administration wants to dramatically expand the nation’s use of wind power, opening large swaths of coastal waters to wind farm development. In a speech before American Clean... Read More

October 13, 2021
by Dan McCue
White House Steps Up Fight Against Supply Chain Woes

WASHINGTON --  In an ideal economy, the nation’s supply chains work something like this: raw materials, finished products and ready-to-assemble... Read More

WASHINGTON --  In an ideal economy, the nation’s supply chains work something like this: raw materials, finished products and ready-to-assemble merchandise like cars and trucks flow into the nation’s ports. The largest of these ports, those blessed to sit on deep-water harbors, typically have rail tracks... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version