Loading...

FBI Faces Senate’s Criticism for Inaction on Sexual Abuse of Olympic Gymnasts

September 16, 2021 by Tom Ramstack
FBI Faces Senate’s Criticism for Inaction on Sexual Abuse of Olympic Gymnasts
United States gymnasts from left, Simone Biles, McKayla Maroney, Aly Raisman and Maggie Nichols, arrive to testify during a Senate Judiciary hearing about the Inspector General's report on the FBI's handling of the Larry Nassar investigation on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021, in Washington. (Saul Loeb/Pool via AP)

WASHINGTON — The sexual abuse perpetrated against female U.S. Olympic gymnasts by former team doctor Larry Nassar was exacerbated by inaction of the FBI, the athletes told a Senate panel Wednesday.

As a result, Nassar sexually abused at least 70 young women before he was caught and sentenced in 2018 to the equivalent of life in prison, the gymnasts said. He had been the doctor for the USA Gymnastics team for 18 years.

“They need to be held fully accountable,” seven-time Olympic medalist Simone Biles said.

She was talking about two FBI agents accused of downplaying early reports of Nassar’s abuse. She asked that they be criminally prosecuted.

”We have been failed and we deserve answers,” Biles said.

One of the FBI agents accused of a lax response was a long-time supervisor in the Indianapolis office. He was fired by the agency.

The other FBI agent retired under a cloud of suspicion in 2018 as the Justice Department’s inspector general investigated the agency’s response.

“To be clear, I blame Larry Nassar, and I also blame an entire system that enabled and perpetrated his abuse,” Biles said.

The inspector general’s report released in July showed it took the FBI more than a year to properly investigate the gymnasts’ allegations, following the first report from Olympic gold medalist McKayla Maroney.

She gave lurid details of how Nassar sexually assaulted her when she was 15 years old during her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“I told the FBI all of this, and they chose to falsify my report, and to not only minimize my abuse but silence me yet again,” Maroney said.

Her accusation of a falsified FBI report was largely supported by an investigation led by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz.

The inspector general said that not only did the FBI agents fail to check out the sexual abuse claims until more than a year later, they lied about their conduct to investigators afterward. The FBI supervisor in the Indianapolis office who wrote up a report of the interview with Maroney made fundamental errors, the inspector general said.

In addition, an FBI agent who was overseeing the investigation talked to USA Gymnastics officials about getting a security job with the Olympic Committee, the inspector general’s report said.

He did not get the job but when he was asked about it by inspector general investigators, he falsely denied applying for it, the report said.

FBI Director Christoper Wray made no effort to defend the former agents. Instead, he offered apologies and pledged that similar mistakes would not happen again.

“The actions and inactions of the FBI employees embodied in this report are totally unacceptable,” Wray said.

The FBI is implementing all of the inspector general’s recommendations, he said. The nation’s top law enforcement agency also is arranging a series of redundant checks to ensure reports of child and athletes’ sexual abuse are properly investigated, he said.

One part of the checks would include greater information-sharing by FBI agents, Wray said. 

“They need to make sure they are reporting to federal and state law enforcement on a parallel track,” he said.

Wray’s assurances of improvements did little to avoid the wrath of lawmakers on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

“Egregious failures like this do not emerge out of nowhere,” said Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., the committee’s chairman.

He added, “The FBI’s handling of the Nassar case is a stain on the bureau.”

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said, “This is a serious problem at the heart of the FBI.”

In The News

Health

Voting

U.S. Senate

Voting Bill Collapses, Democrats Unable to Change Filibuster

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting democracy collapsed when two senators refused... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting democracy collapsed when two senators refused to join their own party in changing Senate rules to overcome a Republican filibuster after a raw, emotional debate. The outcome Wednesday night was a stinging... Read More

January 18, 2022
by Dan McCue
‘Eye of Nation Watching’ as Voting Rights Bill Appears Headed for Defeat

WASHINGTON — With the defeat of sweeping voting rights legislation all but certain in the Senate this week, Majority Leader... Read More

WASHINGTON — With the defeat of sweeping voting rights legislation all but certain in the Senate this week, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer stressed a different goal as he opened the chamber’s session on Tuesday, forcing all senators to go on the record about where they stand... Read More

Sinema, Manchin Slammed as Senate Begins Voting Bill Debate

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing stark criticism from civil rights leaders, senators return to Capitol Hill under intense pressure to change... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing stark criticism from civil rights leaders, senators return to Capitol Hill under intense pressure to change their rules and break a Republican filibuster that has hopelessly stalled voting legislation. The Senate is set to launch debate Tuesday on the voting bill with attention... Read More

January 14, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Senate Bills Seek to Enforce Bans on Stock Trades by Members of Congress

WASHINGTON — Two bills introduced in the Senate this week would broaden the ban on members of Congress buying and... Read More

WASHINGTON — Two bills introduced in the Senate this week would broaden the ban on members of Congress buying and selling stocks while they hold public office. The bills from Democratic Sen. Jon Ossoff and Republican Sen. Josh Hawley follow a Business Insider report showing 52... Read More

January 14, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
Senator Who Clashed with Dr. Fauci Proposes Financial Disclosure Bill

WASHINGTON – A U.S. senator from Kansas who clashed with disease expert Anthony Fauci this week said he plans to... Read More

WASHINGTON – A U.S. senator from Kansas who clashed with disease expert Anthony Fauci this week said he plans to introduce a bill intended to force more disclosure of personal finances onto highly-paid government employees.  Sen. Roger Marshall is calling it the Financial Accountability for Uniquely... Read More

January 14, 2022
by Dan McCue
Sinema, Manchin Double Down on Opposition to Curbing Filibuster

WASHINGTON — Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., made clear Thursday that she supports an effort to pass sweeping voting rights legislation,... Read More

WASHINGTON — Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., made clear Thursday that she supports an effort to pass sweeping voting rights legislation, but she all but doomed the bill to failure by announcing she opposes a change to filibuster rules to bypass oppositions from Senate Republicans. "We must... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version