Trump Administration Moves to Close Offices for International Asylum and Refugee Cases

March 13, 2019by Molly O’Toole

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration took another step Tuesday to cut back services to people seeking to legally enter the U.S. and focus instead on a ballooning backlog of immigration cases, announcing that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agency would close all its international offices.

USCIS foreign operations include reuniting families, overseeing international adoptions and processing requests for U.S. travel for humanitarian emergencies, military members serving overseas and permanent residents seeking to return.

The agency is preparing to shift its international operations to the State Department in order to focus on a backlog of immigration cases, its director, Lee Francis Cissna, said in a memo to agency employees sent out Tuesday and obtained by the Los Angeles Times.

The State Department had no immediate comment on how it would handle the additional workload. The administration has proposed significant reductions in the department’s budget.

Cissna said in his memo that the move would maximize agency resources and help reduce backlogs, “which will ultimately assist our agency to more effectively meet its mission of fairly administering our nation’s lawful immigration system.”

“Following agreement and completing of necessary wind-down procedures, we would move to close the international field offices,” he wrote.

In a statement, USCIS spokesperson Jessica Collins said the agency would “coordinate necessary inter-agency agreements to ensure no interruption in the provision of immigration services to affected applicants and petitioners.”

The agency estimates that the closing of its overseas offices would save millions of dollars without disrupting operations.

With record-high numbers of asylum seekers and a spike in Central American families at the southern border, the administration has struggled to reduce the growing immigration-case backlog in the United States.

According to a database maintained by Syracuse University, 829,608 asylum cases are currently pending, with an average wait of 746 days, or more than two years.

USCIS is the branch of the Homeland Security department charged with processing immigration benefits, citizenship and, in a new focus under the Trump administration, denaturalization. At the border and across the country, USCIS officers interview asylum-seekers to help determine whether their cases will proceed or if they will be removed from the U.S.

The latest move is one of several the administration has taken to devote more resources to processing asylum cases, sometimes at the expense of other immigration-related jobs.

For example, USCIS has reassigned officers who conduct citizenship interviews to the southern border to interview asylum-seekers. In the last two years, wait times for citizenship have doubled.

The agency’s International Operations Division, part of the USCIS Refugee, Asylum, and International Operations Directorate, has about 240 employees in the U.S and abroad, in 24 field offices in 21 countries, from Mexico City and Moscow to Johannesburg and Beijing. Foreign nationals make up one-third of all the division’s employees.

In a follow-up memo on Tuesday obtained by the Times, Jennifer B. Higgins, associate director of the Refugee, Asylum and International Operations Directorate, said all future deployments abroad had been canceled, effective immediately.

“There is no question that this shift will be a significant change for our directorate overall and for so many of you personally,” Higgins said.

Last year, Cissna — whose mother emigrated to the U.S. from Peru — changed USCIS’ mission statement to eliminate the phrase “nation of immigrants.” He told staff the change clarified the agency’s role in “lawful immigration,” seen by some as forecasting an inward turn.

“Change can be difficult and can cause consternation,” Cissna wrote in the Tuesday memo. “I want to assure you we will work to make this as smooth a transition as possible.”

———

©2019 Los Angeles Times

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Immigration

‘We Will Take Our Chances’: Neither Risks Nor Trump-Imposed Roadblocks Deter Migrants Immigration
‘We Will Take Our Chances’: Neither Risks Nor Trump-Imposed Roadblocks Deter Migrants

SONOYTA, Mexico — Marvin Daniel Flores doesn’t pay attention to the news blaring from a radio at a makeshift immigrant camp on the outskirts of this Mexican desert town near the Arizona border. It doesn’t matter to him. It took him six weeks to travel here... Read More

Budgeting for Asylum-Seekers Challenges States and Cities Immigration
Budgeting for Asylum-Seekers Challenges States and Cities

WASHINGTON — Tens of thousands of asylum-seekers from Central America are spreading out around the United States, straining the resources of local and state governments working to move and shelter them. San Diego County has spent more than $1 million since October to house and screen... Read More

ICE Looked to Hire Transport Provider to Move Unaccompanied Minors and Migrant Families Immigration
ICE Looked to Hire Transport Provider to Move Unaccompanied Minors and Migrant Families

MIAMI — Two days before two Florida counties expressed alarm that thousands of migrants could be dropped off in Florida, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement solicited a transportation provider to arrange ground and air transport for unaccompanied minors and migrant families across the country, records show.... Read More

Trump Tries Another Immigration Reset Ahead of 2020 Immigration
Trump Tries Another Immigration Reset Ahead of 2020

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump deployed all the trappings of a Rose Garden ceremony to pitch an incomplete and almost certainly doomed immigration plan Thursday, pushing forward even as his efforts to make progress on his other big 2020 campaign issue — trade — faced new... Read More

Jared Kushner Wades Into the Immigration Debate, With Little to Show So Far Immigration
Jared Kushner Wades Into the Immigration Debate, With Little to Show So Far

WASHINGTON — Jared Kushner’s plan to reform the U.S. immigration system by increasing money for border security and giving more visas for certain foreign workers while reducing family reunification has a little something for everyone — to hate. Even before Kushner, President Donald Trump’s son-in-law and... Read More

Border Patrol Will Screen Asylum Requests in New Push to Restrict Claims, Memos Show Immigration
Border Patrol Will Screen Asylum Requests in New Push to Restrict Claims, Memos Show

WASHINGTON — Homeland Security officials are making it tougher for people seeking asylum to get over the first hurdle in the lengthy process of gaining U.S. protection, giving new power to Border Patrol agents and taking some discretion away from trained asylum officers, according to internal... Read More

Straight From The Well
scroll top