Loading...

FCC Targets Five Chinese Telecoms as Threat to National Security

March 12, 2021 by TWN Staff
FCC Targets Five Chinese Telecoms as Threat to National Security

WASHINGTON – Five Chinese companies are producing telecommunications equipment and services that pose “an unacceptable risk” to national security and the security and safety of U.S. citizens, the Federal Communications Commission announced Friday.

The companies include Huawei Technologies Co., ZTE Corp., Hytera Communications Corp., Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co., and Dahua Technology Co.  

All have been deemed a threat under the Secure and Trusted Communications Networks Act of 2019.

Jessica Rosenworcel, acting chairwoman of the FCC said the publication of the list represents “a big step” toward restoring trust in the nation’s communications networks.

“Americans are relying on our networks more than ever to work, go to school, or access health care, and we need to trust that these communications are safe and secure,” Rosenworcel said. “This list provides meaningful guidance that will ensure that as next-generation networks are built across the country, they do not repeat the mistakes of the past or use equipment or services that will pose a threat to U.S. national security or the security and safety of Americans.”

Included on Friday’s list were:

— Telecommunications equipment produced or provided by Huawei Technologies Co., including telecommunications or video surveillance services produced or provided by such entity or using such equipment;

— Telecommunications equipment produced or provided by ZTE Corporation, including telecommunications or video surveillance services provided or provided by such entity or using such equipment. 

— Video surveillance and telecommunications equipment produced or provided by Hytera Communications Co., to the extent it is used for the purpose of public safety, security of government facilities, physical security surveillance of critical infrastructure, and other national security purposes, including telecommunications or video surveillance services produced or provided by such entity or using such equipment;

— Video surveillance and telecommunications equipment produced or provided by Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Co., to the extent it is used for the purpose of public safety, security of government facilities, physical security surveillance of critical infrastructure, and other national security purposes, including telecommunications or video surveillance services produced or provided by such entity or using such equipment. 

— Video surveillance and telecommunications equipment produced or provided by Dahua Technology Company, to the extent it is used for the purpose of public safety, security of government facilities, physical security surveillance of critical infrastructure, and other national security purposes, including telecommunications or video surveillance services produced or provided by such entity or using such equipment. 

 The agency said ii will update the list if and when other communications equipment and services are determined to meet the criteria under the law.

In The News

Health

Voting

Technology

November 30, 2022
by Kate Michael
Gen Z News Habits and Tech Tools Take Center Stage at Italian Embassy Event

WASHINGTON — A multigenerational audience joined Mariangela Zappia, ambassador of Italy to the United States, at the Embassy of Italy... Read More

WASHINGTON — A multigenerational audience joined Mariangela Zappia, ambassador of Italy to the United States, at the Embassy of Italy in Washington, D.C., Tuesday night for a discussion of Gen Z news and social media trends. “They only know a world that is hyperconnected,” Zappia said... Read More

November 15, 2022
by Dan McCue
Google Pilot Testing Health Care Records Tool

Google is pilot testing the integration of its Google Care Studio search tool into the health records of two health... Read More

Google is pilot testing the integration of its Google Care Studio search tool into the health records of two health systems, one in Alabama and the other in Wisconsin. According to a recent JAMA Network Open study, poor access to the information clinicians need is leading... Read More

November 15, 2022
by Dan McCue
Amazon Makes Renewed Bid for Place in Telehealth Space

SEATTLE — A little more than three months after announcing it was shutting down its telehealth venture Amazon Care, Amazon... Read More

SEATTLE — A little more than three months after announcing it was shutting down its telehealth venture Amazon Care, Amazon is poised to make a comeback in the digital health space. The new venture is called Amazon Clinic, and according to a blog post on Amazon’s... Read More

November 14, 2022
by Dan McCue
Google Agrees to $391.5M Settlement Over Location Tracking Practices

WASHINGTON — Google has agreed to pay $391.5 million to settle claims it misled consumers into believing they opted out... Read More

WASHINGTON — Google has agreed to pay $391.5 million to settle claims it misled consumers into believing they opted out of location tracking when in reality a separate setting in their Web and App activity continued to collect that data. In all, 40 attorneys general participated... Read More

October 5, 2022
by Dan McCue
Schools and Libraries Impacted by Storms to Net Lion’s Share of $96M in Connectivity Funding

WASHINGTON — Schools and libraries impacted by Hurricanes Fiona and Ian will net the lion’s share of $96 million in... Read More

WASHINGTON — Schools and libraries impacted by Hurricanes Fiona and Ian will net the lion’s share of $96 million in new funding through the Federal Communications Commission’s Emergency Connectivity Fund. The new funding will support applications for broadband services and connected devices for students across the... Read More

September 30, 2022
by Madeline Hughes
FCC Shortens Length of Time Satellites Allowed to Remain in Orbit

WASHINGTON — Low-earth satellites must be deorbited after five years, the Federal Communications Commission decided Thursday at its monthly meeting.... Read More

WASHINGTON — Low-earth satellites must be deorbited after five years, the Federal Communications Commission decided Thursday at its monthly meeting. This rule change severely shortens the amount of time satellite operators have to remove their instruments from the skies. They previously had about 25 years, and... Read More

News From The Well