Supreme Court To Start New Term By Telephone

September 17, 2020 by Dan McCue
Supreme Court To Start New Term By Telephone
U.S. Supreme Court building. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court will continue to hold oral arguments by telephone for the start of the new term in October in light of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, a court spokeswoman said Wednesday.

Kathleen Arberg of the court’s public information office said in keeping with public health guidance in response to COVID-19, the Justices and counsel will all participate remotely. 

The Court will provide a live audio feed of the October oral arguments to a media pool as it did for the May arguments. 

The pool participants will in turn provide a simultaneous feed for the oral arguments to livestream on various media platforms for live public access. 

The oral argument audio and a transcript of the oral arguments will also be posted on the Court’s website following oral argument each day.

The Court building remains open for official business only and closed to the public until further notice. 

Arberg said the court will continue to monitor public health guidance as it determines its plans for the November and December argument sessions.

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