Supreme Court Postpones April Argument Session Due to Pandemic

April 3, 2020 by Dan McCue
Chief Justice John Roberts arrives for the State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court on Friday said it would postpone oral arguments scheduled for its April session due to the coronavirus pandemic, making it increasingly unlikely they will be able to hear every case they planned to before their summer recess begins in July.

In a written statement, the court said as a result of the current public health guidance on COVID-19, it would postpone oral arguments that were to have occurred April 20-22 and April 27-29.

The Justices went on to say they will consider rescheduling some cases from the March and April sessions before the end of the term, if circumstances permit.

They also said they will consider a range of scheduling options and other alternatives if arguments cannot be held in the courtroom of the Supreme Court building before the summer.

In the meantime, the justices said they will continue to proceed with the resolution of all cases argued prior to the viral outbreak, and will post their opinions on the court’s website.

The justices are also continuing to hold their regularly scheduled conferences by phone and plan to continue issuing new lists of cases they will hear or not, each week.

As for the Supreme Court building itself, it remains open for official business, but most court personnel are teleworking. The building will remain closed to the public until further notice.

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