Ruth Bader Ginsburg Will Receive This Year’s Liberty Medal

August 27, 2020by Stephan Salisbury, The Philadelphia Inquirer (TNS)
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks during a discussion on the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment at Georgetown University Law Center in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

PHILADELPHIA — Ruth Bader Ginsburg, associate justice of the Supreme Court, has been selected this year’s recipient of the Liberty Medal, the National Constitution Center announced Wednesday.

According to Jeffrey Rosen, head of the NCC, Ginsburg will be the subject of a special video tribute in words and music to be broadcast live on Constitution Day, Sept. 17.

The award makes special mention of her lifelong efforts to advance liberty and equality. Past recipients include Muhammad Ali, Mikhail Gorbachev and Nelson Mandela. Last year’s recipient was former Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The program in Ginsburg’s honor will feature performances by internationally known opera singers and tributes from some of her “special friends,” the NCC said. It will be produced by NBCUniversal.

Known for her sharp legal opinions and forceful dissents — especially on behalf of women’s rights — Ginsburg is the first Jewish woman to serve on the Supreme Court. She was inducted late last year into the Only in America Hall of Fame at Philadelphia’s National Museum of American Jewish History and was the subject of the popular “Notorious RBG” exhibition there.

Jeffrey Rosen, head of the NCC, spent many hours over the last several years discussing Ginsburg’s views on a range of subjects. His book Conversations with RBG: Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law, was published late last year.

Ginsburg, 87, announced in July that she’d had a cancer recurrence and was also hospitalized that month for what the Supreme Court described as a minimally invasive bile duct stent “revision.” She will not travel to Philadelphia to receive the honor.

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©2020 The Philadelphia Inquirer

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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