Loading...

Justice Kavanaugh Tests Positive for COVID on Eve of Barrett Investiture

October 1, 2021 by Dan McCue
Justice Kavanaugh Tests Positive for COVID on Eve of Barrett Investiture
Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh stands before a ceremonial swearing-in in the East Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

WASHINGTON — Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh has tested positive for the coronavirus, the court announced Friday. 

In a brief statement, court spokeswoman Patricia McCabe said the 56-year-old justice has been fully vaccinated since January and that he was not showing any symptoms of the virus.

Kavanaugh was tested on Thursday in anticipation of his attending the ceremonial investiture of Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the court on Friday morning.

“Justice Kavanaugh’s wife and daughters are also fully vaccinated, and they tested negative on Thursday,” McCabe said. “As a precaution, Justice and Mrs. Kavanaugh will not attend Justice Barrett’s investiture.”

All of the justices were tested on Monday morning before a private conference that formally brought an end to their summer break.

“All tested negative, including Justice Kavanaugh,” McCabe said.

Justice Barrett was sworn in as the 103rd associate justice of the Supreme Court on October 27, 2020. Her investiture this morning is purely ceremonial, the delay due to the coronavirus pandemic.

For those unfamiliar with the investiture ceremony, this morning’s event began with Justice Barrett being escorted into the well of the Supreme Court’s courtroom, where she sat in the same chair used by Chief Justice John Marshall during the early 19th century. 

The chair has been used for the investiture of every member of the Court since Lewis Powell, Jr., took his Judicial Oath in 1972.

Gail Curley, the Court’s Marshal, then rapped the gavel and introduce the Chief Justice and

Associate Justices with the Court’s traditional “cry””

“Oyez! Oyez! Oyez! All persons having business before the Honorable, the Supreme Court of the United States, are admonished to draw near and give their attention, for the Court is now sitting.”

The justices then took their places on the bench.

Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco and Acting Solicitor General Brian Fletcher were seated at the counsel table in front of the bench, and Monaco moved to Justice Barrett’s commission read by the clerk.

Justice Barrett was then escorted to the bench, where Chief Justice John Roberts administered the Judicial Oath, with the court clerk standing between them holding a Bible. 

After the oath, Chief Deputy Marshal Richard Nelson escorted Barrett to her seat on the far right of the bench.

The special session adjourned shortly after she took her seat for the first time.

In The News

Health

Voting

Supreme Court

June 28, 2022
by Dan McCue
Bar Association to Honor Justice Breyer

CHICAGO — Justice Stephen Breyer, on the verge of retirement after 28 years on the Supreme Court, is being awarded... Read More

CHICAGO — Justice Stephen Breyer, on the verge of retirement after 28 years on the Supreme Court, is being awarded the ABA Medal, the highest honor conferred by the American Bar Association. Breyer, who for many years has served as the anchor of the so-called liberal... Read More

June 28, 2022
by Eden Metzger
In the Wake of Dobbs, Uncertainty Grows for Foster Care System

WASHINGTON — Among the questions now being asked in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Dobbs v.... Read More

WASHINGTON — Among the questions now being asked in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, overturning 50 years of abortion rights protections, is what the long-term impact will be on the nation’s adoption and foster care systems.... Read More

June 27, 2022
by Dan McCue
Justices Side With Two Doctors Snared in Opioid ‘Pill Mill’ Case 

WASHINGTON — In a unanimous ruling the Supreme Court said on Monday that prosecutors must prove doctors knowingly misprescribed drugs... Read More

WASHINGTON — In a unanimous ruling the Supreme Court said on Monday that prosecutors must prove doctors knowingly misprescribed drugs to secure convictions against them for the unlawful distribution of controlled medicines, like opioids. The decision came down in a case brought by two doctors, Xiulu... Read More

June 27, 2022
by Dan McCue
Supreme Court Sides With High School Coach Who Prayed at 50-Yard Line

WASHINGTON —  A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sided with a high school football coach who claimed the public... Read More

WASHINGTON —  A divided U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sided with a high school football coach who claimed the public school district that employed him violated his free speech and free exercise rights by barring him from praying on the field after games. The 6-3 ruling... Read More

June 24, 2022
by Dan McCue
Justices Uphold HHS Language on Medicare Reimbursements

WASHINGTON — Though few likely noticed given the court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court also decided a... Read More

WASHINGTON — Though few likely noticed given the court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court also decided a highly technical case Friday regarding how the Department of Health and Human Services calculates a class of Medicare payments. The 5-4 ruling in Becerra v. Empire... Read More

Abortion Ruling a Galvanizing Moment in American Life

WASHINGTON — From the president of the United States to ordinary citizens as far away as Hawaii and Guam, nearly... Read More

WASHINGTON — From the president of the United States to ordinary citizens as far away as Hawaii and Guam, nearly everyone, it seemed by Friday afternoon, was talking about the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn two landmark precedents enshrining abortion as a constitutional right. Speaking... Read More

News From The Well