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Justice Ginsburg Hospitalized With Infection

May 6, 2020 by Dan McCue
Justice Ginsburg Hospitalized With Infection
U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg addresses an audience of 4,000 at the 2019 National Book Festival. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON – Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was hospitalized Tuesday after being diagnosed with an infection, the U.S. Supreme Court announced.

A statement posted on the court’s website says the 87-year-old jurist underwent non-surgical treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore Tuesday for acute cholecystitis, a benign inflammation of the gallbladder.

“The justice is resting comfortably,” the statement said.

According to the court, Ginsburg began feeling ill after oral arguments on Monday, and underwent outpatient tests at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington.

Those tests confirmed she was suffering from a gallstone that had migrated to her cystic duct, blocking it and causing an infection. 

The court said Ginsburg will participate in oral arguments Wednesday morning from her hospital room, where she expects to remain for another day or two.

The justices have been holding proceedings by teleconference for the first time in history amid the coronavirus pandemic.

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