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Beshear Removes Barrier to Continuing Education for Kentucky Residents

January 8, 2020 by Dan McCue
Beshear Removes Barrier to Continuing Education for Kentucky Residents
Gov.-elect Andy Beshear celebrates with supporters after voting results showed the Democrat holding a slim lead over Republican Gov. Matt Bevin at C2 Event Venue on Nov. 5, 2019 in Louisville, Ky. Beshear recently signed an executive order restoring voting rights to nonviolent felons after release. (John Sommers II/Getty Images/TNS)

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear announced Tuesday that the state is waiving testing fees for residents seeking to earn a GED.

The fee, which is $120 for all four courses required to get a GED in Kentucky, has long been seen as a barrier not just to educational attainment, but also to employment.

The new waiver could benefit over 335,000 Kentuckians without a GED or high school diploma, more than half of whom are not currently participating in the state’s workforce.

“Education is the key to a better future for the Commonwealth and our citizens,” said Beshear as he announced the new policy.

“This state funding will remove one more barrier for Kentuckians and provide them one more opportunity to earn their GED – a critical piece to helping the more than 335,000 Kentuckians without a GED or high school diploma to participate in our workforce and thrive,” he said.

The state has allotted $600,000 in funding to cover the waived test fees.

Lt. Gov Jacqueline Coleman, who serves as education secretary, also attended the press conference.

“Every Kentuckian has the right to quality education,” she said. “As a teacher, I know there is no greater way to positively change a person’s economic situation than lifting their level of education. This announcement is a step forward for our state and signifies our commitment to education.”

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