Alaska’s New Governor Slashes $444 Million From State Budget

July 2, 2019 by Elin Johnson

Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy cut $444 million from the state’s operating budget  last week, a move he said was critical to moving closer to a balanced budget without raising taxes or reducing the annual Permanent Fund dividend paid to every Alaskan.

The move touched off a firestorm of criticism of the government and sustained calls for the legislature to override Dunleavy’s cuts. That will only happen if three-quarters of the legislature’s 60 members heed those calls. 

There are other voices, however, those who are praising the new governor for attempting to rein in a state government they believe has grown too large.

The deadline for an override is the fifth day of the special session that begins July 8.

Meanwhile the governor has said he simply doesn’t believe Alaska can “continue to be all things for all people.”

The single biggest target of Dunleavy’s line-item veto was the University of Alaska, which lost $130 million on top of a $5 million cut already approved by the legislature.

All told, the cuts represent 41% of the state’s support for the university system.

Included among the 181 other line item cuts was a $2.7 million reduction in public broadcasting funding, and $3.4 million cut from the Ocean Ranger cruise ship pollution inspection program. 

Dunleavy also vetoed $335,000 from the Alaska Supreme Court’s budget, a move widely seen as retribution for the court’s ruling in February that the state constitution prevented a ban on abortions.

Homlessness support services were cut from the state budget from $13.7 million to $2.6 million. 

Dunleavy also shut down the Alaska Senior Benefits Payment Program ending. The program gives a monthly allowance to senior, low-income Alaskans. It serves 11,320 seniors. 

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Alaska’s total population in 2018 was 737,438. 

The Republican was elected in November 2018, after running on promises of reducing citizens’ dependence on the state.

The Permanent Fund Dividend was one of the deciding factors during the recent gubernatorial election. The fund was created to reimburse Alaskans for the use of their land and other resources for oil and gas exploration. 

Each year, Alaskans get a payment from the fund, which has ranged over time from a low of $300 to as much as $2,000. In theory, it is intended to far outlast the amount of oil under the Alaskan tundra.

The Dunleavy administration said the budget cuts had to be made in part to safeguard the fund payments.

But Alaska House Speaker Bryce Edgmon, an Independent, said in a written statement the governor’s budget presents an “imminent threat” to Alaskans.

“The fundamental question is now squarely before Alaskans. What’s more important: a healthy economy, our schools, universities, and seniors, or doubling the Permanent Fund Dividend at the expense of essential state services? The governor has made his choice clear,” Edgmon wrote.

In The News

Health

Voting

State News

New Caucus Aims to Bring Main Street Priorities to Capitol Hill
Congress
New Caucus Aims to Bring Main Street Priorities to Capitol Hill
April 22, 2021
by TWN Staff

Eighteen members of Congress on Wednesday announced the formation of a new Congressional Caucus whose intent is to ensure that the priorities and concerns of cities and counties across America are heard on Capitol Hill. The bipartisan Congressional Caucus of Former Local Elected Officials was formed... Read More

35 States at Extreme Risk of Partisan Gerrymandering
In The States
35 States at Extreme Risk of Partisan Gerrymandering
April 16, 2021
by TWN Staff

Thirty-five states are at extreme or high risk of partisan gerrymandering, according to an in-depth report by the nonpartisan RepresentUs organization. The Gerrymandering Threat Index rates all 50 states, and its authors argue their findings underscore the urgent need to pass the redistricting reforms within the... Read More

Plan Afoot to Extend PPP Deadline to May 31
In The News
Plan Afoot to Extend PPP Deadline to May 31

WASHINGTON - A bipartisan bill to extend the Paycheck Protection Program to May 31 is gaining support in the House and the Senate and will likely be voted on before lawmakers head back to their districts at the end of the month. The proposal to extend... Read More

Cherry Blossom Peak Bloom Date Announced
District of Columbia
Cherry Blossom Peak Bloom Date Announced
March 2, 2021
by TWN Staff

WASHINGTON - It’s hard to believe it’s almost that time of year again, but on Monday came word that the peak bloom for the cherry blossoms ringing the Tidal Basin in Washington is currently expected to occur April 2-5.  That means the most vivid of blooms... Read More

Once the Mainstream Model, Michigan GOP Embraces Right Wing
In The States
Once the Mainstream Model, Michigan GOP Embraces Right Wing

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Josh Venable, a longtime Michigan GOP operative and chief of staff to former U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, can trace the arc of the state's Republican Party clearly."This was the state where to be Republican was defined by Gerald Ford and George... Read More

What NY Prosecutors Could Learn from Trump's Tax Records
In The States
What NY Prosecutors Could Learn from Trump's Tax Records

NEW YORK (AP) — Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. fought for a year and a half to get access to former President Donald Trump's tax records.Now, thanks to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, he will soon have them. But what will that mean for... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top