facebook linkedin twitter

Older Americans More Attentive To COVID-19 News Than Younger Adults

April 28, 2020 by Gaspard Le Dem
Surfers walk onto the sand to prepare to enter the water on April 28, 2020, as coranavirus pandemic restrictions are eased. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)

The coronavirus crisis has dominated headlines in 2020, but research shows some Americans are paying more attention than others.

According to a recent survey from the Pew Research Center, nearly all U.S. adults — about 92% — say they’re keeping a close watch on COVID-19 news. 

But older generations are following more attentively, with more than two thirds of adults 65 and older reporting they follow news of the pandemic very closely, the survey found.

In contrast, only four in 10 adults between the ages of 18 and 29 are following as closely, and middle-aged Americans fall somewhere in between.

The trends have persisted over time. The Pew Research Center gathered data from thousands of Americans in two separate surveys conducted over the course of two weeks, from March 10 to 16 and March 20 to 26.

In that time, coronavirus cases in the U.S. grew exponentially, skyrocketing from just a few scattered cases in early March to more than 180,000 reported cases by the end of the month.

The increase in cases did not have much of an impact on those who were paying the least attention, survey data shows. While the overall percentage of adults paying close attention to the pandemic surged, younger adults remained the least attentive to COVID-19 news.

The overall number of people paying very close attention to news about the coronavirus outbreak increased from 51% to 57%. Yet for adults between 18 and 29 years of age, the numbers increased only marginally, from 40 to 42%.

The biggest change was among middle-aged adults, with a 10 point increase (44 to 54%) for people between 30 and 49, and a nine point increase (54 to 63%) for those between 50 and 64.

From the onset of the outbreak, research has shown that people 65 and older are more likely to die from the coronavirus. Early data from China –– where the crisis began –– showed that fatality rates for COVID-19 patients increased significantly with age.

People with pre-existing medical conditions like diabetes, cancer, or liver disease are also at a greater risk of dying from COVID-19, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Still, younger people are in no way immune. Official counts from the CDC show that hundreds of Americans between the ages of 15 and 34 have died from the disease.

The medical community is still struggling to understand some aspects of the disease. Last week, the Washington Post reported that a growing number of people in their 30s and 40s have been dying from strokes after contracting the virus.

In The News

Health

Voting

Research

Virus's Impact: More Relaxing and Thinking, Less Socializing

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The eruption of COVID-19 last year caused the proportion of people working from home in the... Read More

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The eruption of COVID-19 last year caused the proportion of people working from home in the U.S. to nearly double, with the shift most pronounced among college graduates and workers in such fields as finance and professional services. The share of employed... Read More

July 22, 2021
by Reece Nations
Striking Vulnerability to COVID-19 Found in Diabetics

One of the more disturbing trends of the still ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the susceptibility of diabetic Americans to the... Read More

One of the more disturbing trends of the still ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is the susceptibility of diabetic Americans to the virus. Researchers at The University of Texas at El Paso conducted a study that indicates unmanaged diabetes is a decisive element of COVID-19 severity and complications,... Read More

July 21, 2021
by Dan McCue
Pandemic Drives Largest Drop in Life Expectancy Since WWII

U.S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in 2020, the largest overall decline since World War II,... Read More

U.S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in 2020, the largest overall decline since World War II, the Centers for Disease Control reported Wednesday. The decline to 77.3 years was driven by the coronavirus pandemic, the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics said.... Read More

July 16, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Researchers Find COVID can Cause Disruption in the Brain

Stanford researchers recently published a study which examines the brains of those who died from COVID-19, finding they resembled those with... Read More

Stanford researchers recently published a study which examines the brains of those who died from COVID-19, finding they resembled those with Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative conditions.  “We want to understand how the brain responds to this virus and people with severe disease, and it was a... Read More

July 14, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
Virologists Urge Finding COVID-19’s Origin To Prevent Future Pandemics

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel called a group of virologists together Wednesday to figure out the source of the COVID-19... Read More

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel called a group of virologists together Wednesday to figure out the source of the COVID-19 virus but ended their hearing by concluding they still don’t know. However, they did agree the virus that has killed more than four million people worldwide... Read More

US Overdose Deaths Hit Record 93,000 in Pandemic Last Year

NEW YORK (AP) — Overdose deaths soared to a record 93,000 last year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic,... Read More

NEW YORK (AP) — Overdose deaths soared to a record 93,000 last year in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the U.S. government reported Wednesday. That estimate far eclipses the high of about 72,000 drug overdose deaths reached the previous year and amounts to a 29%... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top