Illinois Loses Population for a Sixth Straight Year

December 31, 2019by Cecilia Reyes
Illinois Loses Population for a Sixth Straight Year

CHICAGO — Illinois’ population went down by an estimated 51,250 people in 2019, or 0.4%, marking the sixth consecutive year the state has lost residents, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Since the turn of the decade, Illinois has lost more residents than any other state, with a drop of about 159,700 people, or 1.2% of its population. Only three other states have shrunk since 2010: Connecticut, Vermont and West Virginia, with the latter losing the largest share of its residents, a 3.3% decline.

Population losses in Illinois have been compounding since 2014, when the state began a steady, though not precipitous, decline. Last year, Illinois dropped to the sixth-most-populous state in the nation, falling behind Pennsylvania and New York.

Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, has lost an estimated 532,095 people since 2010, or 14% of its population.


In examining population trends in Illinois over the past year, the Chicago Tribune found that a decrease in people moving to Illinois from other states and countries exacerbated the impact of declining birth rates and increasing numbers of people moving out of the state.

The new census numbers indicate that the flow of people into and out of Illinois caused the state to lose about 6.8 people per 1,000 residents in the past year. That number combines positive net international migration and negative net domestic migration. People moving to Illinois from other countries, combined with residents who moved abroad, added about 1.5 people per 1,000 residents. But more people moved out of Illinois to other states — about 8.3 people per 1,000 — than moved in.


Illinois’ net domestic migration rate in 2019 was the fourth worst in the nation, behind New York, Hawaii and Alaska.

The new numbers offer only net migration estimates and do not allow comparisons between how many people left Illinois and how many moved in. But in September, the Tribune reported that Illinois stood out in failing to attract new residents from other countries and states.

While the census data released Monday offers a new window into population changes in the state, it is the full census count in 2020 that will be used to determine the number of congressional seats for Illinois as well as to allocate federal funding dollars.

———

©2019 Chicago Tribune


Visit the Chicago Tribune at www.chicagotribune.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Research

June 10, 2022
by Tom Ramstack
NASA to Study Unidentified Aerial Phenomena to Find Source of Unexplained Sightings

WASHINGTON — NASA is making a new effort to figure out the origins of "Unidentified Aerial Phenomena," otherwise known as... Read More

WASHINGTON — NASA is making a new effort to figure out the origins of "Unidentified Aerial Phenomena," otherwise known as UFOs. The space agency announced Thursday it plans to apply scientific methods to information that is publicly available on the unexplained sightings. “Unidentified phenomena in the... Read More

June 2, 2022
by Madeline Hughes
Research and Development Key to America’s Future Progress

WASHINGTON — Government investment in research and development has led to triumphs in war and economic prosperity, but as lawmakers... Read More

WASHINGTON — Government investment in research and development has led to triumphs in war and economic prosperity, but as lawmakers work on the Bipartisan Innovation Act, the question is: Will that continue? “If the United States wants to maintain its global leadership position — national security,... Read More

May 11, 2022
by Kate Michael
Food for Thought: Agro Accounts for a Third of Global Emissions

WASHINGTON — While manufacturing and industry processes are cited as responsible for emitting the most greenhouse gases, food systems also... Read More

WASHINGTON — While manufacturing and industry processes are cited as responsible for emitting the most greenhouse gases, food systems also account for a hefty portion — 31% — of global emissions, and the U.S. and China, as food superpowers, are the two largest contributors. Emissions from... Read More

May 10, 2022
by Dan McCue
Looking Ahead to Hurricane Season …

MIAMI — It happens every year, yet it never ceases to grab our attention, disrupt our sleep and on occasion... Read More

MIAMI — It happens every year, yet it never ceases to grab our attention, disrupt our sleep and on occasion even terrify. We’re talking, of course, about the Atlantic hurricane season, the period extending from June 1 to Nov. 30 when hurricanes are most likely to... Read More

April 26, 2022
by Reece Nations
Highway Death Toll Messages Found to Cause More Crashes

ALEDO, Texas — The message is clear. Roadside safety messages intended to prevent highway accidents were found instead to contribute... Read More

ALEDO, Texas — The message is clear. Roadside safety messages intended to prevent highway accidents were found instead to contribute to the number of crashes along road segments. Researchers from the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management and the University of Toronto’s Munk School of... Read More

April 22, 2022
by Dan McCue
MIT Researchers Seek Long-Term Storage Solution for Wind, Solar Sectors

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A team of Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers is steadily exploring a once radical idea — using... Read More

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — A team of Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers is steadily exploring a once radical idea — using extreme heat to combat climate change — to create an entirely sustainable, grid-scale battery that can store solar and wind energy and deliver it to consumers... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top