facebook linkedin twitter

Biden Administration Supports DC Statehood

April 20, 2021 by Dan McCue
The White House from Lafayette Park. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON – The White House on Tuesday formally threw its support behind the D.C. Statehood bill, saying it would provide the residents of the District with “long overdue full representation in Congress.”

“Establishing the State of Washington, Douglass Commonwealth as the 51st state will make our Union stronger and more just,” the Office of Management and Budget said in a statement of administration policy. “Washington, D.C., has a robust economy, a rich culture, and a diverse population of Americans from all walks of life who are entitled to full and equal participation in our democracy.”

“For far too long, the more than 700,000 people of Washington, D.C., have been deprived of full representation in the U.S. Congress,” the statement continued. “This taxation without representation and denial of self governance is an affront to the democratic values on which our nation was founded. H.R. 51 rights this wrong by making Washington, D.C., a state and providing its residents with long overdue full representation in Congress, while maintaining a Federal District that will continue to serve as our nation’s seat of government.”

The statement further called for Congress “to provide for a swift and orderly transition to statehood for the people of Washington, D.C.”

The House is expected to begin the process of passing the D.C. Statehood Act later today. It is one of three pieces of major legislation the chamber plans to move by the end of the week.

During a virtual meeting with reporters on Tuesday, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said of the bills currently before the House, “the D.C. Statehood Act is the one that I have really focused on … and I believe [it] will correct a longtime blot on our democracy.”

Hoyer said to the best of his knowledge, the United States is the only free democratic country whose capital city does not have a voting member in its legislature.

“Obviously, when the District of Columbia was created, there was not a perception that it would one day grow to the size that it is, nor that it would have home rule, but U.S. citizens living in the District of Columbia are essentially, in some respects, second class citizens,” Hoyer said, adding, “This bill rights an historic wrong.”

Hoyer went on to say he expects every Democrat in the House will vote in favor of the bill, and he said he hopes a significant number of Republicans will vote for it as well.

He noted that some believe admitting the District of Columbia to the fraternity of states is tantamount to admitting a new Democratic stronghold to the union, calling such a notion a “misperception.”

“When Alaska and Hawaii were admitted to the union, there was a clear thought that Alaska would be a Democratic state and Hawaii would be a Republican state. Of course, today, just the opposite is true,” he said.

“The Constitution ensures that states must be treated equally,” Hoyer said. “Right now, the District of Columbia is not treated equally. This bill will correct that.”

In The News

Health

Voting

Political News

July 28, 2021
by Kate Michael
Former Intelligence Officials on the ‘Deteriorating’ Situation in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON -- Had President Biden sought Gen. David Petraeus’s advice on the Allied troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, he has made... Read More

WASHINGTON -- Had President Biden sought Gen. David Petraeus’s advice on the Allied troop withdrawal from Afghanistan, he has made no secret of that fact he would have advised against it, even though the general admits the goals from engaging in 2001 have largely been met. ... Read More

July 28, 2021
by Dan McCue
DOJ Issues ‘Guidance’ Docs for States on Federal Election Laws

WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department released two guidance documents Wednesday intended to ensure states fully comply with federal election laws,... Read More

WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department released two guidance documents Wednesday intended to ensure states fully comply with federal election laws, specifically those statutes pertaining to methods of voting and constraints on post-election audits. “The right of all eligible citizens to vote is the central pillar of... Read More

July 28, 2021
by Dan McCue
Senators Say They’ve Struck Deal on $1.2 Trillion Infrastructure Bill

WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of senators who have been negotiating for weeks on an infrastructure bill since forging an... Read More

WASHINGTON -- A bipartisan group of senators who have been negotiating for weeks on an infrastructure bill since forging an alliance with the White House say they’ve reached a deal on the “major issues” and can now move forward. “I think we’re good to go,” Sen.... Read More

July 28, 2021
by Dan McCue
Census Bureau to Release Redistricting Data Beginning Aug. 16

WASHINGTON -- The Census Bureau will release redistricting data to the states in two formats beginning on Aug. 16. The... Read More

WASHINGTON -- The Census Bureau will release redistricting data to the states in two formats beginning on Aug. 16. The first release will be geared for what the agency calls “experienced data users,” with a second, easier to use release of the same data planned for... Read More

July 28, 2021
by Dan McCue
States to Fight Dismissal of Antitrust Lawsuit Against Facebook

WASHINGTON -- Attorneys general from 45 states, the District of Columbia and Guam served notice on Wednesday that they are... Read More

WASHINGTON -- Attorneys general from 45 states, the District of Columbia and Guam served notice on Wednesday that they are appealing a federal judge’s decision to throw out their antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. “We filed this notice of appeal because we disagree with the court’s decision... Read More

State Lawmakers Work to Strip Old 'Whites Only' Covenants

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Fred Ware and his son were researching the history of the home he's owned in the... Read More

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Fred Ware and his son were researching the history of the home he's owned in the Hartford suburbs since 1950 when they discovered something far uglier than they expected.  Tucked in a list of rules on the home's original deed from the... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top