Pelosi Rips McConnell For 200 Days of Inaction on H.R. 1 Ethics Package

September 27, 2019 by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON – Speaker Nancy Pelosi sharply rebuked Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Friday for allowing 200 days to elapse without any action on H.R. 1, the sweeping reform package the House of Representatives passed last winter.

“We sent this legislation over to the … McConnell, and it’s been sitting there [ever since],” Pelosi said during a Friday press conference on Capitol Hill.

Noting that McConnell has referred to himself as the Grim Reaper when it comes to blocking the steady stream of legislation that’s come out of the House this year, Pelosi warned, “You may think this is dead over there, Grim Reaper … but it is alive and well in the public.

“The people know,” she added. “And they will know more that you are holding this up.”

The House passed H.R. 1, also known as the For The People Act, by a 234-193 vote on March 8.

The massive anti-corruption bill aims to reduce the role of dark money in politics, advance fair and secure elections and restore ethics and integrity to government.

“H.R. 1 restores the people’s faith that government works for the public interest, the people’s interest, not the special interest,” Speaker Pelosi after the March vote.

“It is fundamental to our democracy that people believe that actions taken here will be in their interest. That is what this legislation will help to restore,” she said.

But McConnell quickly declared the bill dead on arrival in the Senate.

“This is a terrible proposal,” he said, voting for it will never get any floor time in the Senate.

On Friday, Pelosi said “it is important to note that Mitch McConnell has said the problem is not that there is too much money in politics, the problem is that there isn’t enough money in politics. 

“If there was ever a declaration of lack of values in terms of our democracy, with stiff competition, that stands as a prominent one,” she said. “It’s time for the Senate to do its job and vote.”

Elections

More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain
In The News
More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain

WASHINGTON — More than ever, Eric Harris is mindful of the elected officials around him: The school board members deciding whether his children will go back to the classroom, the sheriff influencing how officers interact with people like him, and the U.S. president steering the country’s... Read More

Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic
In The News
Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic

WASHINGTON — Dave and Diane Schell, a retired social studies teacher and a retired human resources professional from South Windsor, Connecticut, left their careers in 2015, and have worked the polls at their local precinct every election since. But not this November. The Schells — he’s... Read More

Courts Will Decide Georgia Voting Rights — and Maybe Election Results
State News
Courts Will Decide Georgia Voting Rights — and Maybe Election Results

ATLANTA — Fierce battles over which votes count are already being fought in courts this election season, with armies of voting rights advocates, political parties and attorneys gearing up to bring more challenges to Georgia election laws when ballots are cast. The most significant court intervention... Read More

A Million Mail-in Ballots Could Go Uncounted This Fall. The USPS May Not Be to Blame
2020 Elections
A Million Mail-in Ballots Could Go Uncounted This Fall. The USPS May Not Be to Blame

WASHINGTON — The controversial new chief of the U.S. Postal Service had not even started his job when a disturbing thing happened to hundreds of thousands of Americans who cast ballots by mail in primary elections this spring. Their votes were never counted. The torrent of... Read More

Running an Election in a Pandemic, In 10 Steps
In The News
Running an Election in a Pandemic, In 10 Steps

WASHINGTON — When the pandemic hit and more than a thousand usual poll workers backed out of working the April primary in Madison, Wisconsin, City Clerk Maribeth Witzel-Behl needed replacements who were available to work late, had customer service skills and knew how to assess a... Read More

Absentee Ballot Requests Cropping Up in Front Yards, Churches
2020 Elections
Absentee Ballot Requests Cropping Up in Front Yards, Churches

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As Ohioans stake the names of their preferred candidates in the November election outside their homes, a new form of activism is showing up alongside the traditional candidate yard signs. Absentee ballot requests, voter registration forms and other nonpartisan information about how to... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top