AARP Poll Suggests Midterms Will Be Nailbiters

July 25, 2022 by Natalie McCormick
AARP Poll Suggests Midterms Will Be Nailbiters

WASHINGTON — A new poll of likely voters in the 56 most competitive congressional districts in this year’s midterm elections found that tight races will be commonplace, with Republicans currently holding an edge over Democrats with a sizable cohort of the electorate — voters over 50.

The districts included in the AARP survey were all those rated either “lean” or “tossup” by the Cook Political Report as of June 29. 

The poll found that as of that date, voters gave a generic Republican candidate a 4-point advantage over a generic Democratic candidate.

At the same time, the pollsters found that voters aged 50 and over make up roughly 60% of likely voters in these districts and that 80% of this group said they are “highly motivated” to get to the polls this year. 


“Americans age[d] 50 and over are our nation’s most powerful voters and … candidates should pay close attention to their concerns,” said Nancy LeaMond, the AARP’s executive vice president and chief advocacy and engagement officer.

“Voters in this group are most focused on inflation and pocketbook issues,” she said, adding that among other things, these voters want lower prescription drug prices and for health care to be more affordable for families.

A large number of voters in these key House districts said they are very pessimistic about the direction of the country, with only 14% saying the nation is headed in the right direction.


Thirty-seven percent of voters 50 and over approve of the job President Joe Biden is doing, compared with 50% of voters 50 and up, who said they approved of the job former President Donald Trump did while in office.

When it came to deciding who to vote for, 82% said Social Security was the issue they most cared about, 75% cited Medicare and 69% pointed to the cost of prescription drugs.

Undecided voters aged 50 and over, who made up 11% of respondents, said they were most focused on economic issues for their vote, and felt very positively toward candidates who prioritized protecting older adults.

There was also significant concern among voters aged 50 and over of all partisan stripes that both Social Security and Medicare will not be there when they need it.

Complete poll results can be found here.


AARP commissioned the bipartisan polling team of Fabrizio Ward & Impact Research to conduct the survey. The interviews were conducted via landline (30%), cellphone (35%) and SMS-to-web (35%) between July 5 and 12, 2022. The margin of sampling error for the 1,200 likely voters and 50+ likely voter samples is ±2.83%; for the 300 total samples of Hispanic, Black and Asian American voters 50+, ±5.66%. Interviews were offered in English and Spanish.

Natalie can be reached at [email protected] and @nataliemcc212

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Opinion Polls

VoteCast: Inflation Top Concern, but Democracy a Worry Too

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just as Republicans had hoped, high inflation was the top consideration for voters in the midterm elections,... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just as Republicans had hoped, high inflation was the top consideration for voters in the midterm elections, AP VoteCast shows. But the survey reveals that a core issue for President Joe Biden, the survival of democracy, also weighed heavily on voters’ minds, as... Read More

Most in US Want More Action on Climate Change: AP-NORC Poll

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly two-thirds of Americans think the federal government is not doing enough to fight climate change, according... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly two-thirds of Americans think the federal government is not doing enough to fight climate change, according to a new poll that shows limited public awareness about a sweeping new law that commits the U.S. to its largest ever investment to combat global... Read More

October 14, 2022
by Dan McCue
New Coalition Seeks to Bridge Divide Between Media and Religion

NEW YORK — Like a lot of subjects, the conversation around faith and community is a lot harder today than... Read More

NEW YORK — Like a lot of subjects, the conversation around faith and community is a lot harder today than it was in the not-so-distant past. In the bygone, pre-internet age, when local papers thrived, there was no question that faith and religion were going to... Read More

Biden Hit on Economy as More Say Finances Poor: AP-NORC Poll

WASHINGTON (AP) — More U.S. adults are now feeling financially vulnerable amid high inflation — a political risk for President Joe... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — More U.S. adults are now feeling financially vulnerable amid high inflation — a political risk for President Joe Biden and his fellow Democrats one month before the midterm elections. Some 46% of people now call their personal financial situation poor, up from 37% in March, according... Read More

Poll: Majority in US See Relations With Adversaries Souring

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of U.S. adults expect America's relations with foreign adversaries like Russia and North Korea to... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of U.S. adults expect America's relations with foreign adversaries like Russia and North Korea to grow more hostile, according to a new poll, a major shift in public opinion from four years ago under President Donald Trump. Two years into the... Read More

October 11, 2022
by Dan McCue
Poll Finds Disconnect Between Ohio’s Red State Reputation and Residents’ Views

BEREA, Ohio — Voters in Ohio are a lot more centrist and progressive than most political pundits give them credit... Read More

BEREA, Ohio — Voters in Ohio are a lot more centrist and progressive than most political pundits give them credit for being, a new statewide poll has found. The statewide Ohio Pulse Poll was developed by the Baldwin Wallace University Community Research Institute and conducted by... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top