North Carolina’s GOP-led House Fails to Override Governor’s Veto of Abortion Bill

June 7, 2019 by Dan McCue
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper during a debate at WRAL studios in Raleigh, N.C., on October 18, 2016. (Chris Seward/Charlotte Observer/TNS)

North Carolina’s Republican-led House on Thursday failed to override Democratic Governor Roy Cooper’s veto of a bill that would require doctors to try to preserve the life of an infant born alive during an attempted abortion.

To override Cooper’s veto of the “Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act,” supporters of the bill needed the approval of three-fifths of each chamber of the state legislature.

In the end, the effort to override died in the House in a 67-53 vote.

“It’s important to protect the lives of all children, and laws already exist to protect newborn babies,” Cooper said via Twitter when he learned the result of the vote.

“Instead of passing unnecessary legislation for political purposes we need to move on from divisive social issues and focus on the needs of North Carolina families: education, health care and good-paying jobs,” he said.

Under the proposed North Carolina law, if a health care practitioner did not try to preserve the life of an infant born alive during an abortion attempt, they would be guilty of a class D felony.

The bill went on to say if anyone intentionally “performs an overt act” that kills the baby, they would be guilty of murder.

In a letter announcing his veto in April, Cooper said the bill was an “unnecessary interference between doctors and their patients” and would “criminalize doctors and other healthcare providers for a practice that simply does not exist.”

State News

As SC Primary Approaches, Black Vote Poised to Play Decisive Role
2020 Elections
As SC Primary Approaches, Black Vote Poised to Play Decisive Role
February 21, 2020
by Dan McCue

The arrival of the bus made all heads turn. Mostly blue, its side was dominated by the name "Biden" in large red and white letters, and a slogan, declaring it was dispatched to wage a "Battle for the Soul of the Nation." As the bus pulled... Read More

Most People Still Think Census Will Ask About Citizenship, Poll Finds
Census
Most People Still Think Census Will Ask About Citizenship, Poll Finds

WASHINGTON — Most people incorrectly believe the census will include a citizenship question, according to a pair of surveys released Thursday, adding to concerns raised by advocates that fear over the question may depress participation in the decennial count. The surveys, released by the Pew Research... Read More

A New Poll of 2020 Swing States Shows Just How Important Pa. Will Be
Opinion Polls
A New Poll of 2020 Swing States Shows Just How Important Pa. Will Be

President Donald Trump trails his potential Democratic rivals in Pennsylvania and Michigan and leads outright in Wisconsin, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll of the three Rust Belt swing states that cemented the president’s 2016 victory. Trump is within close range of the Democrats in... Read More

Will There Be More Presidential Caucus Chaos? ‘Nevada is Just Praying’
2020 Elections
Will There Be More Presidential Caucus Chaos? ‘Nevada is Just Praying’

LAS VEGAS — Dozens of Democratic volunteers scurried around Dona Maria Mexican Restaurant in polite pandemonium last week as they staged a mock caucus to prepare for the real thing on Saturday in Nevada. A dining area filled with cries of “Salma Hayek!” “Jennifer Lopez!” “Salma... Read More

Counties Seek Protection of Local Decisions on Fed Autonomous Vehicles Rules
Technology
Counties Seek Protection of Local Decisions on Fed Autonomous Vehicles Rules
February 20, 2020
by Dan McCue

As Congressional lawmakers close in on finalizing a bipartisan, comprehensive bill governing the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles, the nation's county governments are reminding them not to forget to leave room for local decision-making. In a blog post published this week, the National Association of... Read More

Felons Who Can’t Afford Fines and Fees Shouldn’t be Stopped From Voting in Florida, Appeals Court Rules
State News
Felons Who Can’t Afford Fines and Fees Shouldn’t be Stopped From Voting in Florida, Appeals Court Rules

ORLANDO, Fla. — A federal appeals court Wednesday upheld the limited injunction that allowed 17 ex-felons, including some from Orange County, to register to vote despite not being able to afford the fines and fees imposed as part of their sentence. The ruling, by three judges... Read More

Straight From The Well
scroll top