Manafort Slapped With New Charges Minutes After Sentencing

March 14, 2019 by Dan McCue

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was indicted on 16 new charges in New York on Wednesday mere minutes after he was sentenced to an additional three-and-a-half more years in prison on federal conspiracy charges.

Manafort’s latest legal woes stem from an alleged residential mortgage fraud scheme that Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance says netted the once high-flying  political consultant millions.

The indictment unsealed in Manhattan Supreme Court Monday afternoon, accuses Manafort of engaging in a year-long conspiracy to commit mortgage fraud, engaging in a scheme to defraud and falsifying business records.

It was handed down within minutes of U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson rejecting his appeal for no additional time and rebuking him for his crimes and years of lies.

“It is hard to overstate the number of lies and the amount of fraud and the extraordinary amount of money involved,” the judge said before handing down a sentence that could result in Manafort spending the next seven years in prison. “There is no question that this defendant knew better and he knew what he was doing.”

Last Thursday, U.S. District Judge T.S. Ellis III, presiding in a separate case in Virginia, sentenced Manafort to four years in prison, well below Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s recommendation of 19 to 24 years.

Before his sentencing in the federal courthouse in Washington D.C. Wednesday, Manafort read a brief statement in which he said the criminal charges against him have “taken everything from me already — my properties, my cash, my life insurance, my trust accounts for my children and my grandchildren, and more.”

“I am sorry for what I have done and all the activities that have gotten us here today,” Manafort said before adding, “While I cannot undo the past, I will ensure that the future will be very different.”

Prior to Manafort’s statement prosecutor Andrew Weissmann reminded the court that Manafort went to great lengths to conceal his foreign lobbying work and that even while being held in house arrest, coached other witnesses to lie on his behalf.

Weissmann said this behavior is ” evidence that something is wrong with sort of a moral compass.”

Manafort, he said, “served to undermine — not promote — American ideals of honesty, transparency and playing by the rules.”

But Kevin Downing, Manafort’s attorney, said his client was at least in part the victim of media hysteria surrounding Mueller’s ongoing probe into Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.

“That results in a very harsh process for the defendant,” Downing said. “But for a short stint as campaign manager in a national election, I don’t think we would be here today.”

Jackson sentenced Manafort to three and a half years on top of the four years he was given last week, though it is likely that, like Judge Ellis, she will also give him credit for time served.

In The News

ACLU, Planned Parenthood Sue Alabama over Abortion Ban Civil Rights
ACLU, Planned Parenthood Sue Alabama over Abortion Ban
May 24, 2019
by Dan McCue

Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal judge on Friday to block an Alabama law that bans nearly all abortions and makes performing the procedure a felony punishable by up to 99 years in prison. The law, which is considered the most... Read More

Lone House Republican Blocks Passage of Bipartisan Disaster Relief Bill Congress
Lone House Republican Blocks Passage of Bipartisan Disaster Relief Bill
May 24, 2019
by Sean Trambley

In a stunning move Friday, a solitary House Republican from the Freedom Caucus blocked the passage of a $19.1 billion disaster aid package providing aid to Americans hit by wildfires, floods, and hurricanes, including $1.4 billion for Puerto Rico. The funding passed the Senate on Thursday... Read More

Escalating US-Iran Tensions: Sanctions Often Don’t Work in Changing a State’s Behavior Geopolitics
Escalating US-Iran Tensions: Sanctions Often Don’t Work in Changing a State’s Behavior
May 24, 2019
by HJ Mai

The bilateral relationship between the United States and Iran has been strained for decades, but the recent tensions have led to growing concerns over a potential military conflict. The Trump administration this month deployed an aircraft carrier strike group, bombers and Patriot missiles to the Middle... Read More

Remains of Last Known Ship to Carry Slaves to US Found Near Mobile Bay In The News
Remains of Last Known Ship to Carry Slaves to US Found Near Mobile Bay
May 24, 2019
by Dan McCue

The remains of the schooner Clotilda, the last known vessel to carry enslaved African captives to the United States has been found near the mouth of a river that empties into Mobile Bay in Alabama. Search Inc., a Florida-based archaeology and cultural resources management company, announced... Read More

Old Freezer in Warehouse Reveals Terrifying Secret: Body of Woman Missing Nearly 6 Years In The News
Old Freezer in Warehouse Reveals Terrifying Secret: Body of Woman Missing Nearly 6 Years

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — When Lilian Argueta opened a used upright freezer at her scrap business and saw a woman’s body inside, she was so frightened she began to scream. “It thought it was a witch, or a mannequin,” said Argueta, who runs the business in... Read More

‘I Expect a Zombie to Walk Out.’ Life in Paradise, 6 Months After the Camp Fire Featured
‘I Expect a Zombie to Walk Out.’ Life in Paradise, 6 Months After the Camp Fire

PARADISE, Calif. — Phil and Michelle John know they have it better than most. Their house was among the 11% in Paradise that survived the Camp fire, and they moved home in early April. Their street is largely intact, and many of their neighbors have returned.... Read More

Straight From The Well
scroll top