In the Wake of Hurricane Michael, Crist, Williams Move to Help Homeowners and Businesses Better Protect Property From Storm Damage

October 19, 2018 by TWN Staff
Brian Bon inspects damages in the Panama City, Fla., downtown area after Hurricane Michael made landfall along Florida's Panhandle on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (Pedro Portal/Miami Herald/TNS)

In the wake of Hurricane Michael, a fast-moving storm that recently devastated the Florida Panhandle, Representatives Charlie Crist (D-FL) and Roger Williams (R-TX) have come together to address the high cost of flood insurance premiums. The two collaborated at a time when partisanship is at its highest, just before the midterm elections, to introduce bipartisan legislation that they contend is necessary to protect both public safety and the economy.

The lawmakers argue the “State Flood Mitigation Revolving Fund Act” (H.R. 7037) would drive down flood insurance premiums by creating a low-interest loan program to help property owners better protect their homes and businesses from storm damage, ultimately reducing post-disaster claims.

“Bringing down flood insurance premiums while helping folks better protect their homes from storm damage is a win-win for Pinellas families and businesses. Mitigation is key to reducing post-disaster relief costs, saving taxpayer dollars, and building more resilient communities in the face of more extreme weather and rising sea levels. The devastating storms we’ve seen within the last year speak to the urgent need for federal action on flood mitigation programs, protecting public safety and our economy,” said Crist.

Modeled after the successful Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Funds, H.R. 7037 would establish a state revolving loan program to help fund flood mitigation projects for homeowners, businesses, nonprofits, and communities. The program would help states offer low-interest loans to NFIP participants for flood mitigation projects to better protect their properties, reducing post-disaster claims. For those participating in the program, FEMA would offer NFIP premium reductions in line with mitigation efforts taken.

“Flooding is the most common and costliest natural disaster in the United States and it was past time to address the need for mitigation. This legislation will prevent federal post-disaster spending and minimize the unforeseen burdens on American families, as well as the economy,” said Williams.

In a letter to Crist and Williams, Pew Charitable Trusts, Association of State Floodplain Managers, Association of State Wetland Managers, Enterprise Community Partners, Consumer Mortgage Coalition and Union of Concerned Scientists offered strong support for the legislation, referencing its promotion of flood mitigation, flood insurance affordability and assistance for low-income families.

In The News

What They Are Saying About Justice Ginsburg and the Future of the Court
Supreme Court
What They Are Saying About Justice Ginsburg and the Future of the Court
September 19, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court, has injected new uncertainty into the presidential election and set the stage for a bruising political battle in the nation's capital. Even as hundreds of people gathered Friday night... Read More

In The Battleground State of Michigan, Long Memories, New Dynamics
2020 Elections
In The Battleground State of Michigan, Long Memories, New Dynamics
September 19, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The hallmark of a true battleground state is that any one of a variety of factors can come into play and make a sure bet in the weeks leading up to the vote an “also ran” on election night. In that respect Michigan in... Read More

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dies at 87
Supreme Court
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Dies at 87

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a diminutive yet towering women’s rights champion who became the court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington. She was 87. Ginsburg died of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer, the court said. Ginsberg’s death... Read More

Strained Rural Water Utilities Buckle Under Pandemic Pressure
In The News
Strained Rural Water Utilities Buckle Under Pandemic Pressure

WASHINGTON — The months leading up to the coronavirus pandemic already spelled trouble for the Rome Water System and the tiny community it serves in the Mississippi Delta. A tornado tossed around several homes, closed roads and left the community without power for two weeks. Lightning... Read More

More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain
In The News
More People with Felony Convictions Can Vote, but Roadblocks Remain

WASHINGTON — More than ever, Eric Harris is mindful of the elected officials around him: The school board members deciding whether his children will go back to the classroom, the sheriff influencing how officers interact with people like him, and the U.S. president steering the country’s... Read More

Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic
In The News
Wanted: Poll Workers Able to Brave the Pandemic

WASHINGTON — Dave and Diane Schell, a retired social studies teacher and a retired human resources professional from South Windsor, Connecticut, left their careers in 2015, and have worked the polls at their local precinct every election since. But not this November. The Schells — he’s... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top