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Oregon Leads the Pack in Enacting Congressional Maps Based on 2020 Census

October 7, 2021 by Dan McCue
Oregon Leads the Pack in Enacting Congressional Maps Based on 2020 Census
The new congressional district map in Oregon.

SALEM, Ore. – Some states vie to be the first in the nation to vote come primary election season, others grab electoral glory in different ways.

This year, Oregon has the honor of being the first state to enact congressional and state legislative district maps in the wake of the 2020 census.

The state’s Democratic Governor, Kate Brown, signed the new maps into law on Sept. 27, the deadline set by the Oregon Supreme Court last spring after hearing the case State ex rel Kotek v. Fagan and Senate Bill 259.

In doing so, Brown, who called the legislature into special session to draft and adopt the new maps, said “In Oregon, we know that every vote matters because every voice matters in our electoral process.”

She went on to note that for the first time in 40 years, Oregon is gaining a congressional seat with the 2020 census.

“After the past year and a half, during which Oregonians have faced unprecedented challenges that have urgently required federal attention and resources, I am particularly grateful that the legislature has come together to pass today’s historic legislation.”

“We do not always all agree, but when we find common ground, we can work together to do what is best for Oregon,” she said.

According to The Oregonian newspaper, the new congressional map creates three safe Democratic districts, one safe Republican district, one district that leans Democratic, and one toss-up.

But state House Republican Leader Christine Drazan was not happy with the maps signed into law by Brown, vowing “this is by no means over.”

Drazan told the Oregonian she believes the congressional map in particular was “clearly drawn for partisan benefit” and predicted it would not survive a legal challenge.

“Political gerrymandering in Oregon is illegal and drawing congressional lines to ensure five out of six seats for your party long-term is gerrymandering,” Drazan told the newspaper.

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