Loading...

Trump Considers Disposing of D.C. Hotel to End Legal and Political Disputes

October 30, 2019 by Tom Ramstack
The Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON – The Trump organization is considering selling its lease on the downtown Washington Trump International Hotel to resolve legal and political disputes over its ownership and profits.

Controversy surrounding the hotel is part of an ongoing tide of criticism against the Donald Trump as he faces an impeachment investigation.

The Richmond-based 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has scheduled a hearing for Dec. 12 on whether Trump is violating his Constitutional duties by profiting from the hotel while he serves as president. The complaint was filed by the attorneys general of the District of Columbia and Maryland.

The Trump Organization acknowledged it was exploring a sale one day after a congressional committee issued a subpoena to the General Services Administration seeking information about its lease of the Old Post Office Building that became Trump International Hotel.

The Trump Organization could gain $500 million from a sale of the lease, according to a Wall Street Journal report.

The General Services Administration granted Trump a 60-year lease on the 121-year-old building, which lies a short walk from the White House. It opened shortly before he was elected as president in 2016 and has become a frequent destination for foreign diplomats and lobbyists doing business with the White House.

“Since we opened our doors, we have received tremendous interest in this hotel and as real-estate developers, we are always willing to explore our options,” Trump’s son Eric said in a statement.

Eric Trump addressed the conflict of interest complaints when he told the Wall Street Journal, “People are objecting to us making so much money on the hotel, and therefore we may be willing to sell.”

The Trump Organization hired the commercial real estate services firm Jones Lang LaSalle to assist in a possible sale of the lease.

Other conflict of interest allegations arose Saturday when The Washington Post reported that a company linked to the president’s brother recently received a $33 million government contract.

Reston, Va.-based CertiPath provides security for federal courthouses and cell blocks. Robert S. Trump, the president’s younger brother, is an investor in CertiPath through an investment partnership, according to company officials.

On June 25, the U.S. Marshal’s Service announced it was giving CertiPath the $33 million contract to provide digital security and online identity verification.

The announcement drew a complaint to the Justice Department from a rival bidder. The complaint says, “The circumstances of this contract award, and what appear to be CertiPath’s efforts to obscure Mr. Robert Trump’s financial interest in the company even as it trades on the Trump name, present the appearance of preferential treatment for those who are close to the President.

The complaint was filed by the Washington, D.C.-based law firm Venable on behalf of an unnamed client.

Robert Trump continues to serve as president of Trump Management, a company listed on President Trump’s financial disclosure form.

In The News

October 26, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
Microsoft Says Russian Hackers Again Target Global Supply Chain

WASHINGTON — Microsoft announced Monday that the same hackers who tapped into U.S. government computers in the 2020 SolarWinds cyberattack... Read More

WASHINGTON — Microsoft announced Monday that the same hackers who tapped into U.S. government computers in the 2020 SolarWinds cyberattack continue to attack the global supply chain but with a slightly revamped strategy. This time, the Russia-backed group Microsoft calls Nobelium is piggybacking onto the software... Read More

October 25, 2021
by Victoria Turner
FCC Receives Another $1.3B in Funding Requests for Schools, Libraries, Consortia

WASHINGTON — The Federal Communications Commission continues efforts to close the homework gap, announcing another $1.3 billion in funding requests... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Federal Communications Commission continues efforts to close the homework gap, announcing another $1.3 billion in funding requests were received during the second application window of the Emergency Connectivity Fund program today. This second funding round is poised to support another 2.4 million connected... Read More

October 25, 2021
by Reece Nations
DOD Spending, Contract Obligations by State Rose in 2020

WASHINGTON — The Department of Defense’s Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation released its report on defense spending by state,... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Department of Defense’s Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation released its report on defense spending by state, revealing the department’s contract obligations and payroll spending across all 50 states and Washington, D.C. The DOD report was published to highlight DOD’s domestic spending figures... Read More

October 25, 2021
by Dan McCue
White House Issues Detailed Requirements for Foreign Travelers Entering US

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration on Monday released granular new details on the international travel policy set to go into... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Biden administration on Monday released granular new details on the international travel policy set to go into effect on Nov. 8. In a conference call with reporters senior White House officials reiterated the administration’s original announcement: Namely that all non-citizen, non-immigrant air travelers... Read More

UN: Greenhouse Gas Levels Hit a New Record, Cuts Fall Short

GENEVA (AP) — Greenhouse gas concentrations hit a new record high last year and increased at a faster rate than... Read More

GENEVA (AP) — Greenhouse gas concentrations hit a new record high last year and increased at a faster rate than the annual average for the last decade despite a temporary reduction during pandemic lockdowns, the World Meteorological Organization said in a report published Monday. The news... Read More

Opponents of Critical Race Theory Seek to Flip School Boards

GUILFORD, Conn. (AP) — A racial reckoning began years ago for the Guilford school system, first with an episode in... Read More

GUILFORD, Conn. (AP) — A racial reckoning began years ago for the Guilford school system, first with an episode in which a student wore blackface makeup to a home football game and then a fraught debate over the elimination of its mascot, the Indians. After the... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version