Loading...

Election Reform Facing Republican Impasse in Polarized Senate

March 29, 2021 by Reece Nations
Election Reform Facing Republican Impasse in Polarized Senate
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and the Democratic Caucus gather to address reporters on H.R. 1, the For the People Act of 2021, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 3, 2021. House Democrats are expected to pass a sweeping elections and ethics bill, offering it up as a powerful counterweight to voting rights restrictions advancing in Republican-controlled statehouses. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON — Congressional Republicans have painted their Democratic colleagues’ push for election reform legislation as a devastating grab for power ahead of its consideration for passage in the Senate. 

The bill, entitled the “For the People Act of 2021,” seeks to overhaul the existing elections process by standardizing automatic voter registration, restoring the voting rights of individuals who have completed felony sentences, and allows for sworn statements for individuals affirming their citizenship if they are unable to produce necessary identification to vote, among other measures. 

President Joe Biden urged Congress to pass the bill after state lawmakers in Georgia passed a bill that imposes stricter voter identification requirements for absentee balloting, limits vote-by-mail drop boxes and eliminates the secretary of state from chairing the Board of Elections. The Georgia bill also authorizes the state legislature to appoint members to the state elections board and bolsters its authority over county elections boards. 

“This law, like so many others being pursued by Republicans in statehouses across the country is a blatant attack on the Constitution and good conscience,” Biden said in a written statement in reference to the Georgia law. “This is Jim Crow in the 21st Century. It must end. We have a moral and Constitutional obligation to act.” 

Republicans maintained the federal elections reform bill overrules existing checks and balances designed to limit voter fraud and fortify election security during a Senate Committee on Rules and Administration hearing last week. While the bill’s proponents during the hearing argued the bill made significant strides in election transparency by mandating organizations to disclose large donors, its opponents contended it usurped states’ rights by imposing provisions that are costly and hard to implement. 

The House of Representatives passed the bill along party lines by a margin of 220-210, with every Democrat voting in favor and every Republican opposed. Passing the bill in the narrowly divided Senate will be impossible without outside support from Republicans. 

“Under this bill, there’s automatic registration of anybody — if you get a driver’s license, if you get a welfare payment, if you get an unemployment payment, if you attend a public university,” said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in opposition to the bill during the hearing. “Now, everyone knows there are millions of illegal aliens who have driver’s licenses, who are getting welfare benefits, who attend public universities.” 

During the hearing, West Virginia Secretary of State Mac Warner also expressed concerns about the automatic voter registration provisions that would add individuals as young as 16 years of age to voter rolls. Doing so “overrules checks and balances in our election security,” he said, although 23 states allowed individuals under 18 years old to preregister to vote as of February 2019, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. 

However, the act does not amend current laws prohibiting undocumented immigrants from voting in federal elections. Although the bill does require each state to adopt automatic registration systems, it clarifies only legal citizens are eligible for registration. 

In March 2019, the American Civil Liberties Union circulated a letter in opposition to a previous incarnation of the bill, urging lawmakers to strike down the effort. In his testimony at the hearing, Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., noted the ACLU’s prior opposition to the “For The People Act of 2019,” although the letter in question called the bill “the beginning of a sustained effort to reform and improve our democracy,” which was unlikely to pass in the formerly Republican-led Senate. 

The ACLU commended the previous bill’s commitment to restoring protections of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which were dampened by the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby County v. Holder to disable the federal preclearance process. 

The current bill also obligates states to adopt independent redistricting commissions to draw congressional districts and fortifies enforcement of federal ethics law, TWN previously reported. These and other provisions are a response to state-led efforts to overhaul their own voting systems and intend to create nation-wide uniformity in the process. 

“At its core, the For the People Act is about three simple ideas: making voting easier, getting big money out of politics, and strengthening ethics rules,” said Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., chair of the Senate rules and administration committee. “These are not radical proposals. These are ideas that nearly everyone in this country agrees with. And with this bill, we can make them a reality and ensure that Americans have a democracy that works for them.” 

In The News

Health

Voting

In The News

February 3, 2023
by Tom Ramstack
Lawmakers Want Justice Department to Investigate More Trump Supporters

WASHINGTON — House Democrats are asking the Justice Department's inspector general to investigate whether Special Counsel John Durham and former... Read More

WASHINGTON — House Democrats are asking the Justice Department's inspector general to investigate whether Special Counsel John Durham and former Attorney General Bill Barr abused their authority with their review of Congress' Russia inquiry. The Democrats say they suspect Durham and Barr might have been helping... Read More

February 3, 2023
by Dan McCue
Bipartisan Bill to Benefit ‘VetDogs’ Reintroduced

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan bill intended to benefit service dogs working with disabled veterans has been reintroduced by Rep. Patrick... Read More

WASHINGTON — A bipartisan bill intended to benefit service dogs working with disabled veterans has been reintroduced by Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C. H.R. 807, The Working Dog Commemorative Coin Act, would direct the Treasury Department to mint a three-coin commemorative series honoring the role working dogs... Read More

February 3, 2023
by Kate Michael
Officials Wary of Aid Fatigue for Ukrainian Refugees

WASHINGTON — As a full year closes in on what Russia calls its special military operation in Ukraine, the United... Read More

WASHINGTON — As a full year closes in on what Russia calls its special military operation in Ukraine, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that over 7.8 million Ukrainian refugees have fled to neighboring countries and over 65 million people are internally displaced. While... Read More

February 3, 2023
by Dan McCue
Comer Determined to Advance Inquiries Into Bidens, White House

WASHINGTON — Speaking before the National Press Club this week, House Oversight Chair James Comer, R-Ky., said his panel is... Read More

WASHINGTON — Speaking before the National Press Club this week, House Oversight Chair James Comer, R-Ky., said his panel is determined to press investigations into President Joe Biden and his family to ensure they did not illegally profit from relationships with China. “Unfortunately … I feel... Read More

February 3, 2023
by Dan McCue
Biden Travels to Philadelphia Bearing $500M for Water Upgrades

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden will travel to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Friday afternoon to announce $500 million has been allocated to... Read More

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden will travel to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Friday afternoon to announce $500 million has been allocated to the city's water upgrades and lead pipe removal. According to senior White House officials, about $160 million of that total will be allocated through the bipartisan... Read More

February 3, 2023
by Dan McCue
White House Celebrates Klain, Welcomes Back Zients in East Room Ceremony

WASHINGTON — It was a victory lap and, as victory laps often are, it was accompanied by a fair amount... Read More

WASHINGTON — It was a victory lap and, as victory laps often are, it was accompanied by a fair amount of tears. The White House called it the “official transition event” from one chief of staff to another, but it quickly became clear in the packed... Read More

News From The Well