Loading...

Kansas Health Officials Urging Residents Not to Take Livestock Drug for COVID

September 1, 2021 by Dan McCue
(Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

TOPEKA, Kan. – A drug most commonly given to horses and cows as an anti-parasite medicine should not be taken by humans to treat or prevent COVID-19, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment said in a Wednesday advisory.

Ivermectin was introduced as a veterinary drug in the late 1970s, and the discovery of its effectiveness in combating rosacea, head lice or some parasitic worms in humans won the 2015 Nobel Prize for medicine.

Despite more than a dozen studies of the drug involving more than 1,600 participants, there is currently no evidence of the drug’s ability to prevent COVID, improve patient conditions or reduce mortality.

But that hasn’t stopped people from taking to social media and making false claims regarding its alleged COVID-curing powers.

Some health officials have compared the current mania surrounding Ivermectin to last year’s surge in belief of a malaria drug, hydroxychloroquine, to cure or prevent COVID — claims that were ultimately roundly debunked.

According to researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who cited data from the American Association of Poison Control Centers, calls to poison control centers about ivermectin exposures have risen dramatically this summer.

While some people have actually gotten a prescription from their doctor, others have resorted to getting it from livestock supply stores.

That has only served to compound the risk because livestock drugs are highly concentrated for large animals and can be highly toxic in humans.

So pervasive has the situation become that the Food and Drug Administration last week tweeted a message to consumers. 

“You are not a horse. You are not a cow. Seriously, y’all. Stop it,” the agency said, with a warning explaining that ivermectin is not F.D.A.-approved for treating or preventing COVID-19 and that taking large doses can cause serious harm.

As for the warning out of Kansas, Dr. Lee Norman, secretary of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment , said, “Kansans should avoid taking medications that are intended for animals and should only take Ivermectin as prescribed by their physician.” 

“These highly concentrated doses can cause severe illness and even death in humans. The COVID-19 vaccine remains the most effective way to prevent COVID-19,” Norman said.

An Ivermectin overdose includes gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Overdoses are associated with hypotension and neurologic effects such as decreased consciousness, confusion, hallucinations, seizures, coma, and death. Ivermectin may intensify the effects of other drugs that cause central nervous system depression, such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates.

Health officials in Kansas stress the COVID-19 vaccine is the safest and most effective way to prevent getting sick and protect against severe disease and death from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, including the delta variant. 

In addition to the vaccine, wearing a mask, washing your hands, and social distancing will help stop the spread of the virus, they said.

Health

October 20, 2021
by Dan McCue
FDA Signs Off on Moderna, J&J Boosters, Mixing Vaccines

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday said Americans who got either the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson... Read More

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday said Americans who got either the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine can now get a COVID-19 booster, and also say that those eligible for a booster don’t have to get the same brand as their initial... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
EPA Accelerates Efforts to Clean Up PFAS Pollution

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new roadmap to accelerate efforts to protect Americans from per- and polyfluoroalkyl... Read More

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new roadmap to accelerate efforts to protect Americans from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, a class of toxic chemicals found in food packaging and other common commercial products that can cause severe health problems. "We are exploring ways for... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Developer of Gene Editing Tool Discusses Ethics of Emerging Treatments

It was only nine years ago that researchers discovered a method for editing human genes using a specialized technology called... Read More

It was only nine years ago that researchers discovered a method for editing human genes using a specialized technology called the CRISPR-Cas9 tool.   CRISPR-Cas9 enables geneticists and medical researchers to edit parts of the genome by removing, adding or altering sections of the DNA sequence.  Ethicists,... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Middle-Aged Women at Higher Risk of ‘Broken Heart’ Syndrome

LOS ANGELES - A new study from researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center appears to confirm what many have long argued:... Read More

LOS ANGELES - A new study from researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center appears to confirm what many have long argued: That a “broken heart” really can lead to long-term heart injury. “We know from other studies the heart-brain connection is very strong, but this is one... Read More

White House Details Plans to Vaccinate 28M Children Age 5-11

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children age 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children age 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's office, local pharmacy and potentially even their school, the White House said Wednesday as it detailed plans for the expected authorization of the Pfizer shot for... Read More

Pig-to-Human Transplants Come a Step Closer with New Test

Scientists temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in... Read More

Scientists temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but... Read More

News From The Well
Exit mobile version