HHS Encouraging Americans to Review Their Medicare Options During Open Enrollment

October 14, 2022 by Dan McCue
HHS Encouraging Americans to Review Their Medicare Options During Open Enrollment
HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON — Medicare Open Enrollment begins on Saturday, Oct. 15, and officials with the Department of Health and Human Services are encouraging Medicare recipients to review and compare their options due to beneficial changes stemming from the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act.

“We are committed to providing comprehensive and easily accessible information to support people with Medicare in their decision making,” said Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, in a written statement. 

“Medicare.gov makes it easier than ever to compare coverage options and shop for plans. People can do a side-by-side comparison of plan coverage, costs, and quality ratings to help them more easily see the differences between plans,” she said.

Medicare’s Open Enrollment period, which extends through Dec. 7 this year, gives people with Medicare the opportunity to make changes to their health plan or prescription drug plan, pick a Medicare Advantage plan, or return to original Medicare (also referred to as Medicare Part A and Part B). 

Coverage changes take effect Jan. 1, 2023.

In a press release the department noted that Medicare plans can change their offerings and costs every year, and individuals’ health needs can change from year-to-year, too. 

“Now is the time for people with Medicare to review their coverage options and make a choice that best meets their health care needs,” it said.

Most if not all people with Medicare will see lower average premiums for Medicare Part B, Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D prescription drug plans in 2023.

This year, as a result of President Joe Biden signing the Inflation Reduction Act into law Medicare enrollees will also see lower costs for insulin and vaccines beginning in 2023. 

Starting in 2023, all people with Medicare who take insulin covered by their prescription drug plan or through a traditional pump covered under original Medicare will pay no more than $35 in cost-sharing for a month’s supply of each covered insulin product. 

People with Medicare also will not pay a deductible with respect to each covered insulin product. 

Additionally, people with Medicare drug coverage will pay nothing out-of-pocket for adult vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — including the shingles vaccine and Tetanus-Diphtheria-Whooping Cough vaccine. 

More information on Medicare and the changes associated with the Inflation Reduction Act can be found here.

Dan can be reached at [email protected] and at https://twitter.com/DanMcCue.

A+
a-
  • Department of Health and Human Services
  • Medicare
  • Medicare Open Enrollment
  • In The News

    Health

    Voting

    Health

    Weedkiller Manufacturer Seeks Lawmakers' Help to Squelch Claims it Failed to Warn About Cancer

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Stung by paying billions of dollars for settlements and trials, chemical giant Bayer has been... Read More

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Stung by paying billions of dollars for settlements and trials, chemical giant Bayer has been lobbying lawmakers in three states to pass bills providing it a legal shield from lawsuits that claim its popular weedkiller Roundup causes cancer. Nearly identical bills... Read More

    April 16, 2024
    by Dan McCue
    Agency Sets Rules Limiting Miners’ Exposure to Hazardous Silica Dust

    WASHINGTON — The Mine Safety and Health Administration issued a new rule on Tuesday aimed at better protecting the nation’s... Read More

    WASHINGTON — The Mine Safety and Health Administration issued a new rule on Tuesday aimed at better protecting the nation’s miners from health hazards associated with exposure to respirable crystalline silica, also known as silica dust.  Inhaling crystalline silica, a known carcinogen, can cause serious lung... Read More

    Biden Administration Announces Partnership With 50 Countries to Stifle Future Pandemics

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration will help 50 countries identify and respond to infectious diseases, with the goal... Read More

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration will help 50 countries identify and respond to infectious diseases, with the goal of preventing pandemics like the COVID-19 outbreak that suddenly halted normal life around the globe in 2020. U.S. government officials will work with the countries to develop better testing, surveillance,... Read More

    Are Americans Feeling Like They Get Enough Sleep? Dream On, a New Gallup Poll Says

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you're feeling — YAWN — sleepy or tired while you read this and wish you... Read More

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you're feeling — YAWN — sleepy or tired while you read this and wish you could get some more shut-eye, you're not alone. A majority of Americans say they would feel better if they could have more sleep, according to a... Read More

    April 15, 2024
    by Jesse Zucker
    Are You Getting Enough Iron?

    WASHINGTON — Feeling tired and sluggish? If so, low iron could be to blame. Iron is an essential mineral necessary... Read More

    WASHINGTON — Feeling tired and sluggish? If so, low iron could be to blame. Iron is an essential mineral necessary for several critical bodily functions. While most people get enough iron, women and athletes may be at a higher risk for an iron deficiency. Here, we’ll... Read More

    April 15, 2024
    by Jesse Zucker
    The Truth About Metabolism

    WASHINGTON — Metabolism is a common buzzword used to sell products and convey different theories. Many popular myths and questions... Read More

    WASHINGTON — Metabolism is a common buzzword used to sell products and convey different theories. Many popular myths and questions surround this process. Are certain foods good or bad for your metabolism? Do some people have a slower or faster metabolism than others? Here, we’ll use... Read More

    News From The Well
    scroll top