HHS Encouraging Americans to Review Their Medicare Options During Open Enrollment

October 14, 2022 by Dan McCue
HHS Encouraging Americans to Review Their Medicare Options During Open Enrollment
HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra. (Photo by Dan McCue)

WASHINGTON — Medicare Open Enrollment begins on Saturday, Oct. 15, and officials with the Department of Health and Human Services are encouraging Medicare recipients to review and compare their options due to beneficial changes stemming from the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act.

“We are committed to providing comprehensive and easily accessible information to support people with Medicare in their decision making,” said Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, in a written statement. 

“Medicare.gov makes it easier than ever to compare coverage options and shop for plans. People can do a side-by-side comparison of plan coverage, costs, and quality ratings to help them more easily see the differences between plans,” she said.

Medicare’s Open Enrollment period, which extends through Dec. 7 this year, gives people with Medicare the opportunity to make changes to their health plan or prescription drug plan, pick a Medicare Advantage plan, or return to original Medicare (also referred to as Medicare Part A and Part B). 


Coverage changes take effect Jan. 1, 2023.

In a press release the department noted that Medicare plans can change their offerings and costs every year, and individuals’ health needs can change from year-to-year, too. 

“Now is the time for people with Medicare to review their coverage options and make a choice that best meets their health care needs,” it said.


Most if not all people with Medicare will see lower average premiums for Medicare Part B, Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D prescription drug plans in 2023.

This year, as a result of President Joe Biden signing the Inflation Reduction Act into law Medicare enrollees will also see lower costs for insulin and vaccines beginning in 2023. 

Starting in 2023, all people with Medicare who take insulin covered by their prescription drug plan or through a traditional pump covered under original Medicare will pay no more than $35 in cost-sharing for a month’s supply of each covered insulin product. 

People with Medicare also will not pay a deductible with respect to each covered insulin product. 

Additionally, people with Medicare drug coverage will pay nothing out-of-pocket for adult vaccines recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — including the shingles vaccine and Tetanus-Diphtheria-Whooping Cough vaccine. 


More information on Medicare and the changes associated with the Inflation Reduction Act can be found here.

Dan can be reached at [email protected] and at https://twitter.com/DanMcCue.

A+
a-

In The News

Health

Voting

Health

Polio is Back in Indonesia, Sparking Vaccination Campaign

PIDIE, Indonesia (AP) — Children in school uniforms and toddlers with their parents lined up Monday for polio vaccinations in... Read More

PIDIE, Indonesia (AP) — Children in school uniforms and toddlers with their parents lined up Monday for polio vaccinations in the Sigli town square on the northern tip of the Indonesian island of Sumatra, after four children were found infected with the highly contagious disease that... Read More

MyPlate? Few Americans Know or Heed US Nutrition Guide

Here’s a quick quiz: What replaced the food pyramid, the government guide to healthy eating that stood for nearly 20... Read More

Here’s a quick quiz: What replaced the food pyramid, the government guide to healthy eating that stood for nearly 20 years? If you’re stumped, you’re not alone. More than a decade after Agriculture Department officials ditched the pyramid, few Americans have heard of MyPlate, a dinner... Read More

November 28, 2022
by Dan McCue
$50M Available to Clean Up Orphaned Oil and Gas Wells on Tribal Lands

WASHINGTON — The Department of the Interior has issued a final guidance for tribes on how to apply for the... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Department of the Interior has issued a final guidance for tribes on how to apply for the first $50 million in grant funding available under the bipartisan infrastructure law to clean up orphaned oil and gas wells. The legislation provides a total of... Read More

Schools Struggle to Staff Up for Youth Mental Health Crisis

Mira Ugwuadu felt anxious and depressed when she returned to her high school in Cobb County, Georgia, last fall after... Read More

Mira Ugwuadu felt anxious and depressed when she returned to her high school in Cobb County, Georgia, last fall after months of remote learning, so she sought help. But her school counselor kept rescheduling their meetings because she had so many students to see. “I felt... Read More

November 17, 2022
by Dan McCue
FDA Conditionally Approves First Drug to Manage Acute Pancreatitis in Dogs

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration has conditionally approved Panoquell-CA1 for the management of clinical signs associated with acute... Read More

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration has conditionally approved Panoquell-CA1 for the management of clinical signs associated with acute onset of pancreatitis in dogs.  Panoquell-CA1 is an injectable drug intended for use while the dog is hospitalized for treatment of the disease.   Pancreatitis is a... Read More

November 15, 2022
by TWN Staff
Case Western Reserve University Awarded $7.3M for Eye Research

CLEVELAND — Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $7.3 million grant from the National... Read More

CLEVELAND — Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded a five-year, $7.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to identify new technology, methods and models to study the impact of inflammation and pain on the surface of the eye. “The cornea... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top