First Lady to Host Roundtable on Breast and Cervical Cancer

October 21, 2022by The Associated Press
First Lady to Host Roundtable on Breast and Cervical Cancer
First lady Jill Biden speaks at the Communities In Schools' Leadership Town Hall Conference, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

WASHINGTON (AP) — First Lady Jill Biden will host a roundtable Monday on breast and cervical cancer, part of the administration’s “moonshot” effort to reduce deaths from cancer, the White House said.



The event is one of many being launched by the American Cancer Society. Singer Mary J. Blige, an advocate for cancer screening, will participate in the roundtable with Biden.

President Joe Biden announced in February his goal of halving cancer deaths in the next 25 years. The issue is personal for Biden, whose son Beau Biden died in 2015 of brain cancer. Biden launched the cancer moonshot the following year when serving as then-President Barack Obama’s vice president.


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