facebook linkedin twitter

FDA Experts Among Group Opposing US Booster Shot Plan

September 14, 2021by Lauren Neergaard and Matthew Perrone, Associated Press
Parsia Jahanbani prepares a syringe with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine in a mobile vaccine clinic operated by Families Together of Orange County in Santa Ana, Calif. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

The average person doesn’t need a COVID-19 booster yet, an international group of scientists — including two top U.S. regulators — wrote Monday in a scientific journal.

The experts reviewed studies of the vaccines’ performance and concluded the shots are working well despite the extra-contagious delta variant, especially against severe disease.

“Even in populations with fairly high vaccination rates, the unvaccinated are still the major drivers of transmission” at this stage of the pandemic, they concluded.

The opinion piece, published in The Lancet, illustrates the intense scientific debate about who needs booster doses and when, a decision the U.S. and other countries are grappling with.

After revelations of political meddling in the Trump administration’s coronavirus response, President Joe Biden has promised to “follow the science.” But the review raises the question of whether his administration is moving faster than the experts.

The authors include two leading vaccine reviewers at the Food and Drug Administration, Drs. Phil Krause and Marion Gruber, who recently announced they will be stepping down this fall. Among the other 16 authors are leading vaccine researchers in the U.S., Britain, France, South Africa and India, plus scientists with the World Health Organization, which already has urged a moratorium on boosters until poor countries are better vaccinated.

In the U.S., the White House has begun planning for boosters later this month, if both the FDA and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agree. Advisers to the FDA will weigh evidence about an extra Pfizer shot Friday at a key public meeting.

Georgetown University’s Larry Gostin said the paper “throws gasoline on the fire” in the debate about whether most Americans truly need boosters and whether the White House got ahead of scientists.

“It’s always a fundamental error of process to make a scientific announcement before the public health agencies have acted and that’s exactly what happened here,” said Gostin, a lawyer and public health specialist.

The FDA did not respond to requests for comment Monday morning.

The U.S. already offers an extra dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines to people with severely weakened immune systems. 

For the general population, the debate is boiling down to whether boosters should be given even though the vaccines are still offering high protection against severe disease — possibly in hopes of blocking milder “breakthrough” infections among the fully vaccinated. 

Last week, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said new data showed that as delta surged, the unvaccinated were 4.5 times more likely than the fully vaccinated to get infected, over 10 times more likely to be hospitalized and 11 times more likely to die. Still, government scientists are also weighing hints that protection is waning among older adults who were vaccinated early last winter.

The writers of Monday’s commentary reported reviewing worldwide studies since delta began surging, mostly of U.S. and European vaccines. The team concluded “none of these studies has provided credible evidence of substantially declining protection against severe disease.”

Because the body builds layers of immunity, gradual drops in antibody levels don’t necessarily mean overall effectiveness is dropping “and reductions in vaccine efficacy against mild disease do not necessarily predict reductions in the (typically higher) efficacy against severe disease,” they wrote.

The more the virus spreads, the more opportunity it has to evolve into strains that could escape current vaccines. The Lancet reviewers suggest there could be bigger gains from creating booster doses that better match circulating variants, much like flu vaccine is regularly updated, than from just giving extra doses of the original vaccine.

“There is an opportunity now to study variant-based boosters before there is widespread need for them,” the scientists wrote. 

Health

September 24, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
CDC Director Overrides Vote to Broaden Eligibility for Vaccines

ATLANTA, Ga.-- Dr. Rochelle Walensky made an unusual break Friday from a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory... Read More

ATLANTA, Ga.-- Dr. Rochelle Walensky made an unusual break Friday from a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel by overruling its guidance on booster doses for the Pfizer/BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices approved the boosters Thursday for anyone 65... Read More

Biden Urges COVID-19 Booster Shots for Those Now Eligible

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Joe Biden on Friday urged those now eligible for COVID-19 booster shots to get the added... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Joe Biden on Friday urged those now eligible for COVID-19 booster shots to get the added protection a day after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention endorsed the doses for millions of older or otherwise vulnerable Americans.  Opening a major new... Read More

September 23, 2021
by Reece Nations
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service to Distribute Federal Funding to Rural Hospitals

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is disbursing an initial amount of $2 million to four health care entities... Read More

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is disbursing an initial amount of $2 million to four health care entities in four states to bolster access to their services in underserved communities. Funds will be distributed to participating hospitals in rural areas to overhaul their health... Read More

September 22, 2021
by Tom Ramstack
Protecting Children During Pandemic Guides Policy at Congressional Hearing

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel on Wednesday examined whether the federal government’s strategy is appropriate for protecting children during the... Read More

WASHINGTON -- A congressional panel on Wednesday examined whether the federal government’s strategy is appropriate for protecting children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Lawmakers asked about the potential for vaccinating children, having them return safely to school and whether they should wear masks. The update they sought... Read More

September 22, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
OSHA Will Issue Federal Heat Standard for U.S. Workplaces 

WASHINGTON -- Extreme heat has played a role in worsening health outcomes, especially for minority communities and for construction and... Read More

WASHINGTON -- Extreme heat has played a role in worsening health outcomes, especially for minority communities and for construction and farm workers at risk of heat stroke.  In response to rising temperatures due to climate change, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is set to issue... Read More

September 22, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
NIH Invests $1.67 Million to Study How Vaccines Impact the Menstrual Cycle 

WASHINGTON -- The NIH recently invested $1.67 million in five institutions to explore the link between COVID-19 vaccines and menstruation... Read More

WASHINGTON -- The NIH recently invested $1.67 million in five institutions to explore the link between COVID-19 vaccines and menstruation changes, as some women are reporting irregular or missing menstrual periods after receiving a vaccine.  Only a few weeks after the NIH investment was released, an... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top