facebook linkedin twitter

Fauci Warns Senate Panel of “Really Serious” Consequences to Fast Reopening

May 12, 2020 by Dan McCue
Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks remotely during a virtual Senate Committee for Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions hearing, Tuesday, May 12, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Win McNamee/Pool via AP)

WASHINGTON – Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, told a Senate panel on Tuesday there could be “really serious” consequences to states and cities across the United States reopening their economies too quickly.

He told the Senate Health, Labor and Pensions Committee that communities reopening without adequate safeguards in place “could turn the clock back.”

“My concern is that we will start to see little spikes that might turn into outbreaks,” Fauci said.

Besides Fauci, of the National Institutes of Health, the other experts addressing the panel Tuesday were FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn and Dr. Robert Redfield, head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

Also scheduled to speak was Adm. Brett Giroir, the coronavirus testing expert at the Department of Health and Human Services.

Fauci’s testimony came as President Donald Trump continued to praise states that are reopening after the weeks-long lockdown aimed at controlling the virus’s spread. 

He testified via video conference after self-quarantining as a White House staffer tested positive for the virus.

As recently as Monday Trump tweeted, “The Democrats are moving slowly, all over the USA, for political purposes. They would wait until November 3rd if it were up to them. Don’t play politics. Be safe, move quickly!”

But Fauci appeared to contradict the president Tuesday, and sounded more like New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo and others who have said the faster they move toward some semblance of normalcy, the more illnesses and deaths that occur due to the virus.

“There is no doubt, even under the best of circumstances, when you pull back on mitigation you will see some cases appear,” Fauci said.

There have been over 1.35 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 81,076 deaths in the U.S. since the beginning of the year, according to Johns Hopkins University.

According to the Associated Press, a total of 17 states do not meet the White House criteria for loosening stay-at-home orders and other restrictions — a 14-day downward trajectory in new cases or positive test rates. 

Yet many of these states have begun to reopen or are about to do so. Of the 33 states that have had a 14-day downward trajectory of either cases or positive test rates, 25 are partially opened or are moving to reopen soon, the AP said.

Health

October 20, 2021
by Dan McCue
FDA Signs Off on Moderna, J&J Boosters, Mixing Vaccines

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday said Americans who got either the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson... Read More

WASHINGTON - The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday said Americans who got either the Moderna or Johnson & Johnson vaccine can now get a COVID-19 booster, and also say that those eligible for a booster don’t have to get the same brand as their initial... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
EPA Accelerates Efforts to Clean Up PFAS Pollution

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new roadmap to accelerate efforts to protect Americans from per- and polyfluoroalkyl... Read More

This week, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new roadmap to accelerate efforts to protect Americans from per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, a class of toxic chemicals found in food packaging and other common commercial products that can cause severe health problems. "We are exploring ways for... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Developer of Gene Editing Tool Discusses Ethics of Emerging Treatments

It was only nine years ago that researchers discovered a method for editing human genes using a specialized technology called... Read More

It was only nine years ago that researchers discovered a method for editing human genes using a specialized technology called the CRISPR-Cas9 tool.   CRISPR-Cas9 enables geneticists and medical researchers to edit parts of the genome by removing, adding or altering sections of the DNA sequence.  Ethicists,... Read More

October 20, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Middle-Aged Women at Higher Risk of ‘Broken Heart’ Syndrome

LOS ANGELES - A new study from researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center appears to confirm what many have long argued:... Read More

LOS ANGELES - A new study from researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center appears to confirm what many have long argued: That a “broken heart” really can lead to long-term heart injury. “We know from other studies the heart-brain connection is very strong, but this is one... Read More

White House Details Plans to Vaccinate 28M Children Age 5-11

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children age 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Children age 5 to 11 will soon be able to get a COVID-19 shot at their pediatrician's office, local pharmacy and potentially even their school, the White House said Wednesday as it detailed plans for the expected authorization of the Pfizer shot for... Read More

Pig-to-Human Transplants Come a Step Closer with New Test

Scientists temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in... Read More

Scientists temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top