facebook linkedin twitter

Faith-based Approaches Can Overturn Vaccine Hesitancy

June 23, 2021 by Alexa Hornbeck
FILE - In this Sunday, June 7, 2020, file photo, a hundred faithful sit while minding social distancing, listening to Los Angeles Archbishop Jose H. Gomez celebrate Mass at Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, the first Mass held in English at the site since the re-opening of churches, in downtown Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

A recent survey conducted by the Public Religion Research Institute and Interfaith Youth Core finds that faith-based approaches supporting vaccine uptake can influence members of key hesitant groups to get vaccinated.

Religious leaders can help overturn hesitancy by battling popular assumptions that groups like QAnon have been churning out, such as the government, media and finance sectors are controlled by a group of Satan-worshipping pedophiles. 

Faith-based approaches include religious leaders encouraging vaccine acceptance, receiving a vaccine themselves, religious communities holding information forums, religious communities providing vaccine appointment assistance, or a congregation site serving as a vaccination site.

More than one in four, or 26%, of Americans who are hesitant to get a COVID-19 vaccine, and even 8% of those who are resistant to getting a vaccine, report that at least one of the six faith-based approaches supporting vaccinations would make them more likely to get vaccinated.

For vaccine-hesitant white evangelical Protestants, nearly half who attend services say faith-based approaches would make them more likely to get vaccinated, and for Black protestants and Hispanic Americans, that number is nearly one-third.

This is also the case for 24-26% of Republicans and rural Americans.

Protestant Christians, who have higher rates of vaccine hesitancy, and faith-based approach on vaccine uptake might change those outcomes as 70% of Black Protestants and 66% of white evangelical protestants turn to a religious leader for at least a little information about a vaccine.

Notably, three in ten of those who are worried about the safety of vaccines say that faith-based approaches would make them more likely to get vaccinated. 


Methodology: The survey was designed and conducted by PRRI and IFYC among a random sample of 5,149 adults (ages 18 and over) living in all 50 states in the United States and who are part of Ipsos’s Knowledge Panel, and an additional 476 who were recruited by Ipsos using opt-in survey panels to increase the sample sizes in smaller states. The full sample is weighted to be representative of the U.S. population. Interviews were conducted online between March 8 and 30, 2021. The margin of error for the national survey is +/- 1.5 percentage points at the 95% level of confidence, including the design effect for the survey of 1.4.

Health

FDA Panel Takes Up Tough Questions on J&J COVID-19 Boosters

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health advisers on Friday tackled who should get boosters of Johnson & Johnson's single-shot COVID-19 vaccine... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health advisers on Friday tackled who should get boosters of Johnson & Johnson's single-shot COVID-19 vaccine and when — and whether using a competing brand for the second dose might provide better protection. The push for boosters kicked off last month after... Read More

FDA Panel Endorses Lower-Dose Moderna COVID Shot for Booster

U.S. health advisers said Thursday that some Americans who received Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine should get a half-dose booster to bolster... Read More

U.S. health advisers said Thursday that some Americans who received Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine should get a half-dose booster to bolster protection against the virus. The panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted unanimously to recommend a booster shot for seniors, adults with other... Read More

Nursing Schools See Applications Rise, Despite COVID Burnout

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — Nurses around the U.S. are getting burned out by the COVID-19 crisis and quitting, yet applications... Read More

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — Nurses around the U.S. are getting burned out by the COVID-19 crisis and quitting, yet applications to nursing schools are rising, driven by what educators say are young people who see the global emergency as an opportunity and a challenge. Among them... Read More

FDA Spells Out Lower Sodium Goals for Food Industry

NEW YORK (AP) — Food companies are coming under renewed pressure to use less salt after U.S. regulators spelled out... Read More

NEW YORK (AP) — Food companies are coming under renewed pressure to use less salt after U.S. regulators spelled out long-awaited guidelines aimed at reducing sodium levels in dozens of foods including condiments, cereals, french fries and potato chips. The voluntary goals finalized Wednesday for 163... Read More

October 13, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
Gene Editing Treatment Used in Human Subjects With Rare Genetic Blindness

WASHINGTON — New data presented by researchers from Editas Medicine, a leading genome editing company, reveals that gene editing treatments... Read More

WASHINGTON — New data presented by researchers from Editas Medicine, a leading genome editing company, reveals that gene editing treatments are not only safe in humans, but may hold promise of treating a rare retinal disease that leads to blindness. “We believe these findings validate the... Read More

October 13, 2021
by Alexa Hornbeck
How Telehealth is Helping Address Veteran Food Insecurity

WASHINGTON -- The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted veterans' access to food, leading to greater food insecurity, and according to officials... Read More

WASHINGTON -- The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted veterans' access to food, leading to greater food insecurity, and according to officials from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, telehealth is now helping to combat the issue.  “The COVID-19 pandemic certainly has been impactful for many Americans,... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top