Loading...

CDC Issues Warnings, Guidelines About Thanksgiving

November 11, 2020by Tim Darnell, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
CDC Issues Warnings, Guidelines About Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving for two. (Photo by Dan McCue)

ATLANTA — The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its Thanksgiving coronavirus guidelines on Monday and Tuesday, warning against travel and recommending much smaller gatherings during the annual American tradition.

Thanksgiving travel is typically the nation’s busiest transportation day of the year. “Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others,” the CDC said.

While the organization isn’t recommending canceling the holiday, it is recommending smaller dinners with people who live in single households; contact-free meal deliveries; virtual dinners; watching events on TV at home; and Black Friday and Cyber Monday online shopping only.

Moderate-risk activities are listed as small outdoor dinners and small outdoor sports events with safety precautions in place. High-risk activities are crowded stores, parades and large indoor gatherings.

The CDC said older adults and others at heightened risk of severe illness should avoid gathering with people outside their households.

Experts point to Canada, where Thanksgiving was celebrated Oct. 12. Clusters of cases tied to family gatherings followed. “This sucks. It really, really does,” Canada Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said two weeks later.

Anyone traveling is urged to check travel restrictions, get a flu shot, wear a mask, wash your hands and practice social distancing, among other measures.

The U.S. surpassed 10 million confirmed cases of the coronavirus Monday, the same day President-elect Joe Biden urged all Americans to wear a mask in an effort to contain the pandemic’s spread.

Johns Hopkins University of Medicine has been tracking the pandemic’s spread over the globe. New daily confirmed cases are up more than 60% during the last two weeks, to an average of nearly 109,000 a day. Average daily cases are on the rise in 48 states.

The U.S. accounts for about one-fifth of the world’s nearly 51 million confirmed cases. U.S. coronavirus deaths are up 18% during the last two weeks, averaging 939 every day. The virus has now killed more than 238,000 Americans.

Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris were briefed virtually Monday morning on the coronavirus pandemic by a task force of experts their transition team announced only hours earlier. Biden and Harris were then scheduled to hold hours of internal meetings about transitioning to the White House in January.

“We could save tens of thousands of lives if everyone would just wear a mask for the next few months. Not Democratic or Republican lives, American lives,” Biden said. “Please, I implore you, wear a mask.”

Biden said he wants to ramp up production of personal protective equipment and testing supplies, saying, “The bottom line: I will spare no effort to turn this pandemic around.”

Public health officials warn the nation is entering the worst stretch yet for COVID-19 as winter sets in and the holiday season approaches, increasing the risk of rapid transmission as Americans travel, shop and celebrate with loved ones.

“The next two months are going to be rough, difficult ones,” said Dr. Albert Ko, an infectious disease specialist and department chairman at the Yale School of Public Health. “We could see another 100,000 deaths by January.”

As the Democratic nominee, Biden made President Donald Trump’s handling of the pandemic a central focus of his campaign. But much of what Biden has proposed will take congressional action, and he’s certain to face challenges in a closely divided House and Senate.

“I’m not running on the false promises of being able to end this pandemic by flipping a switch. But I do promise this: We will start on day one doing the right things,” he said during a campaign event last month.

___

(c)2020 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, Ga.)

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

In The News

Health

Voting

Health

Theories Emerge for Mysterious Liver Illnesses in Children

NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials remain perplexed by mysterious cases of severe liver damage in hundreds of young children... Read More

NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials remain perplexed by mysterious cases of severe liver damage in hundreds of young children around the world. The best available evidence points to a fairly common stomach bug that isn't known to cause liver problems in otherwise healthy kids. That... Read More

May 18, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
CalAIM Launches Program to Reform Housing and Health Care Coverage in California  

A new program launched this year out of California called CalAIM helps high-risk and low-income Medi-Cal residents find affordable housing... Read More

A new program launched this year out of California called CalAIM helps high-risk and low-income Medi-Cal residents find affordable housing through their health insurance plans. The CalAIM program is intended to improve health outcomes of Medi-Cal enrollees, specifically those with behavioral health needs, seniors, people living... Read More

May 18, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
Smart Pacifier Provides Non-Invasive Way to Monitor Babies’ Electrolytes in Hospitals

Researchers from Washington State University released a study on Monday regarding their development of a smart pacifier that can be used to... Read More

Researchers from Washington State University released a study on Monday regarding their development of a smart pacifier that can be used to monitor infant health in hospitals. The wireless, bioelectronic pacifier will eliminate the need for invasive, twice-daily blood draws to monitor babies’ electrolytes in newborn intensive care... Read More

May 18, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
WHO and UNICEF Release Report on Role of Assistive Technologies 

The World Health Organization and UNICEF released a report on Monday that finds more than 2.5 billion people need one or more... Read More

The World Health Organization and UNICEF released a report on Monday that finds more than 2.5 billion people need one or more assistive products, such as wheelchairs, hearing aids or apps that support communication and cognition.  Despite the need, nearly 1 billion are denied access to such technologies,... Read More

May 18, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
House Committee Advances Legislation for Medication Access and Training for Opioid Addiction 

During a mark-up session on Wednesday, the House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to advance provisions of the Medication Access and Training... Read More

During a mark-up session on Wednesday, the House Energy and Commerce Committee voted to advance provisions of the Medication Access and Training Expansion Act, known as the MATE Act. The legislation is designed to ensure controlled medication prescribers have a baseline knowledge of how to treat patients suffering with... Read More

May 18, 2022
by Alexa Hornbeck
FDA Approves First At-Home Test for Detecting COVID, Flu and RSV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized the first at-home test that can identify and differentiate multiple respiratory viruses at... Read More

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized the first at-home test that can identify and differentiate multiple respiratory viruses at the same time, detecting influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.  “While the FDA has now authorized many COVID-19... Read More

News From The Well