Loading...

Avian Flu Reported in Poultry in Kansas and Illinois

March 14, 2022 by Tom Ramstack
A flock of young turkeys stand in a barn at the Moline family turkey farm after the Mason, Iowa farm was restocked on Aug. 10, 2015. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Agriculture Department is confirming two cases of avian flu in Kansas and Illinois among flocks of poultry.

So far, no humans have been infected. The flocks are under quarantine and will be depopulated, the Agriculture Department said.

Avian flu most recently created a scare in 2017 when the World Health Organization reported dozens of cases among humans. Nearly all the infected persons worked on farms in close contact with poultry.

Domesticated chickens, turkeys and ducks are most commonly infected but it also has been found in wild birds.

The bigger concern is that avian flu could mutate into a variant that is easily transmitted to humans, perhaps causing another deadly pandemic. Its respiratory symptoms tend to be severe and potentially deadly.

“The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza in a non-commercial backyard mixed species flock in Franklin County, Kansas, and a non-commercial backyard mixed species flock in Mclean County, Illinois,” the Agriculture Department’s notice on Saturday says.

The virus was first found in university veterinary labs in both states before being confirmed at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

“State officials quarantined the affected premises, and birds on the properties will be depopulated to prevent the spread of the disease,” the government notice says. “Birds from the flocks will not enter the food system.”

Agriculture Department officials say they plan to continue monitoring poultry in the area to ensure the disease does not spread.

On various occasions, the highly infectious strain of avian flu has been found in 12 U.S. states.

Only four humans are known to have been infected in the U.S. since 2002, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Humans who have gotten sick typically were in close contact with infected birds after they shed bodily fluids like saliva, mucus or feces. The people became infected when the fluids touched their eyes, nose or mouth, the CDC reported.

Internationally, bird flu has created greater concerns.

Between early 2013 and early 2017, there were 916 confirmed human cases of H7N9 bird flu reported to the World Health Organization, most of them in China.

The biggest outbreak among poultry in the U.S. was from 2014 through 2015. It led to about 51 million birds being killed to control spread of the disease. The birds were being raised for their eggs or meat.

The 2014-2015 avian flu outbreak cost $879 million in public expenditures. The U.S. egg and poultry industry lost more than $3 billion before the disease was eradicated, according to Agriculture Department figures.

Tom can be reached at tom@thewellnews.com

In The News

Health

Voting

Health

Biogen Pays $900M to Settle Doctor Kickback Allegations

BOSTON (AP) — Biogen has agreed to pay $900 million to resolve allegations that it violated federal law by paying... Read More

BOSTON (AP) — Biogen has agreed to pay $900 million to resolve allegations that it violated federal law by paying kickbacks to doctors to persuade them to prescribe its multiple sclerosis drugs, federal prosecutors said. The agreement announced Monday settles a whistleblower lawsuit brought by former... Read More

Teen Interest in Long-Lasting Birth Control Soars After Roe

Sixteen-year-old Adismarys Abreu had been discussing a long-lasting birth control implant with her mother for about a year as a... Read More

Sixteen-year-old Adismarys Abreu had been discussing a long-lasting birth control implant with her mother for about a year as a potential solution to increasing menstrual pain. Then Roe v. Wade was overturned, and Abreu joined the throng of teens rushing to their doctors as states began... Read More

September 26, 2022
by Dan McCue
Harvard Report Provides Tips on Bullying Chronic Inflammation

BOSTON — A new report from Harvard Medical School offers practical advice on how to deal with chronic, low-grade inflammation,... Read More

BOSTON — A new report from Harvard Medical School offers practical advice on how to deal with chronic, low-grade inflammation, an ailment that contributes to the development of cancer, cardiovascular disease and other life-threatening conditions. Currently, about three out of five people around the world die... Read More

September 26, 2022
by TWN Staff
Prenatal Steroid Treatment May Improve Survival for Extremely Preterm Infants

WASHINGTON — Steroid treatment before birth appears to improve survival and reduce complications among extremely preterm infants, according to a... Read More

WASHINGTON — Steroid treatment before birth appears to improve survival and reduce complications among extremely preterm infants, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.  Antenatal steroid therapy, given to women at risk of preterm delivery, causes the fetal lungs to mature and... Read More

September 26, 2022
by Dan McCue
Arizona Judge Revives State’s 19th Century Near-Total Ban on Abortion

TUCSON, Ariz. — A near-total ban on abortion written nearly 50 years before Arizona became the nation’s 48th state must... Read More

TUCSON, Ariz. — A near-total ban on abortion written nearly 50 years before Arizona became the nation’s 48th state must be enforced as a result of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, a state circuit court judge ruled on Friday. The ruling... Read More

Pfizer Seeks to Expand Omicron Booster to 5- to 11-Year-Olds

(AP) -- Pfizer asked U.S. regulators Monday to expand use of its updated COVID-19 booster shot to children ages 5 to... Read More

(AP) -- Pfizer asked U.S. regulators Monday to expand use of its updated COVID-19 booster shot to children ages 5 to 11. Elementary school-aged children already received kid-sized doses of Pfizer’s original vaccine, a third of the dose given to everyone 12 and older -- two primary... Read More

News From The Well