Harvard Does Not Discriminate Against Asian Americans, Judge Rules

October 1, 2019 by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON — A federal judge in Boston ruled Tuesday that while “not perfect” Harvard University’s admissions process does not discriminate against Asian Americans.

U.S. District Judge Allison D. Burroughs’ ruling comes in a 2014 lawsuit filed by the group Students for Fair Admissions, which accused the Ivy League school of bias against Asian-American applicants, saying it holds them to a higher standard than students of other races.

The plaintiffs claimed the alleged policy amounted to an “Asian penalty,” while black and Hispanic students were more readily admitted, even with poorer grades.

At the heart of the dispute was an internal report prepared at Harvard in 2013 that looked at the role race played in the university’s admissions. It found that if the school weighed applicants based on academics alone, 43% of the admitted class would be Asian American, while in reality, it was 19%.

Harvard denied any discrimination and said it considers race only as one of many factors when considering applicants.

The lawsuit has been closely watched ever since as the outcome has implications for scores of other U.S. colleges that say they consider race to admit a diverse mix of students.

Judge Burroughs said she found “no evidence of any racial animus whatsoever” in Harvard’s admissions policy.

The group has also sued the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, over alleged discrimination against Asian American applicants. That suit, also filed in 2014, is ongoing.

The group has already said it will appeal Burroughs’ decision.

“Students for Fair Admissions is disappointed that the court has upheld Harvard’s discriminatory admissions policies,” Edward Blum, the group’s president, said in a statement. “We believe that the documents, emails, data analysis and depositions SFFA presented at trial compellingly revealed Harvard’s systematic discrimination against Asian-American applicants.”

Harvard did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Education

Supreme Court Sounds Ready to Support Public Aid to Religious Schools
Education
Supreme Court Sounds Ready to Support Public Aid to Religious Schools

WASHINGTON — Some Supreme Court justices on Wednesday sounded ready to rule that states offering scholarships or subsidies to private schools must include those operated by churches. The court’s conservatives, including Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., said that excluding private schools because they are religious... Read More

Supreme Court to Tackle Issues of Religion and School Choice This Week
Political News
Supreme Court to Tackle Issues of Religion and School Choice This Week
January 21, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court on Wednesday will wade into a thorny battle over school-choice programs and state aid for religious schools as it weighs a request from three Montana families to allow a state scholarship program to fund their children's Christian education. The petitioners in... Read More

House Overturns DeVos Barrier to Student Loan Forgiveness in Bipartisan Vote
Education
House Overturns DeVos Barrier to Student Loan Forgiveness in Bipartisan Vote
January 17, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The House voted Thursday to overturn regulations introduced by Education Secretary Betsy Devos that critics contend made it more difficult for students to have their loans forgiven in the event a college made misleading or false claims. The resolution to overturn DeVos' rule change... Read More

Foundation President Endorses House Asthma and Allergy Bill
Health
Foundation President Endorses House Asthma and Allergy Bill
January 9, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - A bipartisan bill intended to close gaps in the care of public school students with asthma and food allergies is "an important step" in promoting the health of the 11.5 million American children who suffer from these conditions, an expert on the issue told... Read More

Beshear Removes Barrier to Continuing Education for Kentucky Residents
State News
Beshear Removes Barrier to Continuing Education for Kentucky Residents
January 8, 2020
by Dan McCue

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear announced Tuesday that the state is waiving testing fees for residents seeking to earn a GED. The fee, which is $120 for all four courses required to get a GED in Kentucky, has long been seen as a barrier not just to... Read More

Some States Move Toward Financial Aid Based on Need Rather Than Merit
Education
Some States Move Toward Financial Aid Based on Need Rather Than Merit

State-funded merit scholarships are politically popular. But as college tuition rises, policymakers in some states are starting to rethink financial aid that disproportionately benefits white, wealthy students and often duplicates scholarships awarded by public universities. Lawmakers in Georgia added a need-based grant last year, as did... Read More

Straight From The Well
scroll top