facebook linkedin twitter

OSHA Will Issue Federal Heat Standard for U.S. Workplaces 

September 22, 2021 by Alexa Hornbeck
Asphalt workers (Photo via Pixabay)

WASHINGTON — Extreme heat has played a role in worsening health outcomes, especially for minority communities and for construction and farm workers at risk of heat stroke. 

In response to rising temperatures due to climate change, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is set to issue a new rule on heat illness prevention for outdoor and indoor work settings on days when the heat index exceeds 80° F.  

On Monday, the White House announced that OSHA will implement a way to enforce heat-related hazards by developing a National Emphasis Program on heat inspections, and launching a rule making process for developing the workplace heat standard.  

OSHA’s enforcement initiative will encourage employers to implement intervention methods on heat priority days, such as regularly taking breaks for water, rest, shade, and training workers to identify common symptoms of heat-related illness and have a plan for how to respond.

Each year, thousands of workers experience heat-related illness in the workplaces, and in 2019 at least 2,410 workers suffered serious injuries and illnesses.  

The increase in heat is also leading to a loss in productivity and work hours resulting in wage losses for workers.  

An estimated $100 billion in economic losses from heat could double by 2030 and quintuple by 2050 under higher emissions scenarios, according to a report from the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center.  

Aside from economic losses, the report also finds that extreme heat could cause nearly 60,000 excess deaths per year by 2050. 

Starting October 2021, OSHA will issue an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on heat injury and illness prevention in outdoor and indoor work settings. A comment period following the issue of notice will allow OSHA to gather perspectives from technical experts on heat stress thresholds, heat acclimatization planning, exposure monitoring and strategies to protect workers.  

The agency will also establish a national emphasis program for heat hazard cases by 2022 to target high-risk industries and focus on agency resources and staff time on heat inspections.  

Employment

October 21, 2021
by Dan McCue
Renewable Energy Jobs Reach 12 Million Worldwide, Report Says

The number of people working in the renewable energy sector worldwide reached 12 million last year, up from 11.3 million... Read More

The number of people working in the renewable energy sector worldwide reached 12 million last year, up from 11.3 million in 2019, according to a new report from the International Renewable Energy Agency. The eighth edition of “Renewable Energy and Jobs: Annual Review 2021,” was written... Read More

US Jobless Claims Fall to New Pandemic Low of 290,000

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week to a new low point since... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week to a new low point since the pandemic erupted, evidence that layoffs are declining as companies hold onto workers. Unemployment claims dropped 6,000 to 290,000 last week, the third straight drop, the... Read More

Businesses Nervously Await Fine Print of Vax-or-Test Rule

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than six weeks after promising a new vaccination-or-testing rule covering the millions of Americans at companies... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than six weeks after promising a new vaccination-or-testing rule covering the millions of Americans at companies with 100 or more workers, President Joe Biden's most aggressive move yet to combat the COVID-19 pandemic is almost ready to see the light of day. ... Read More

Commerce Head Out to Save US Jobs, 1 Computer Chip at a Time

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gina Raimondo only wears watches made by Bulova — a company that laid off her scientist father,... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gina Raimondo only wears watches made by Bulova — a company that laid off her scientist father, closed its Rhode Island factory and moved production to China in 1983. The watches give Raimondo, the U.S. commerce secretary, a sense of mission as President... Read More

Nursing Schools See Applications Rise, Despite COVID Burnout

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — Nurses around the U.S. are getting burned out by the COVID-19 crisis and quitting, yet applications... Read More

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — Nurses around the U.S. are getting burned out by the COVID-19 crisis and quitting, yet applications to nursing schools are rising, driven by what educators say are young people who see the global emergency as an opportunity and a challenge. Among them... Read More

Americans Quit Their Jobs at a Record Pace in August

WASHINGTON (AP) — One reason America's employers are having trouble filling jobs was starkly illustrated in a report Tuesday: Americans... Read More

WASHINGTON (AP) — One reason America's employers are having trouble filling jobs was starkly illustrated in a report Tuesday: Americans are quitting in droves.  The Labor Department said that quits jumped to 4.3 million in August, the highest on records dating back to December 2000, and... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top