New Survey Says Most Schools Weren’t Prepared For COVID-19 Disruption

October 5, 2020 by Sara Wilkerson
Parents, students and education acitivsts hold a news conference to announce a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Unified School District on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. The suit was filed by black and Latino families concerned that the district's distance learning plan violates students' California constitutional rights to a basic public education. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

A new survey conducted by the Rand Corporation researchers indicates that most schools were not fully prepared for remote instruction and prolonged school closures at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Rand researchers compiled responses from 957 elementary and secondary school principals across the country from the American Educator Panels, a coalition of nationally representative educators who provide feedback on important issues of educational policy and practices. 

Researchers asked principals if their schools had these five educational practices in place pre-pandemic:

1. providing devices (e.g., laptops, tablets) to at least those students who need them

2. training teachers on delivering online instruction

3. using an LMS

4. providing fully online or blended learning courses

5. establishing plans to deliver instruction during a prolonged school closure.

Principals were also asked about specific aspects of their remote instruction at the onset of COVID-19, such as whether or not they gave letter grades for students and if principals had concerns about their school’s equity in instruction. 

Additionally, principals were asked to predict how student achievement in various subgroups would fare compared to those last year. 

Of their nearly 1,000 responses, researchers concluded that most schools (64%) were likely to provide electronic access for those students that needed it. 

However, at the same time, not many schools had plans in place for prolonged school closures. Only 20% of schools said they had a pre-pandemic closure plan. 

Of those surveyed, most principals (84%) said they had at least one preparedness indicator in place for their schools ahead of the coronavirus shutdowns, however researchers note that, “very few principals (7%) reported their schools had all five.” 

When looking at elementary versus secondary school preparedness, researchers found that secondary schools generally had more preparedness indicators than their elementary counterparts. 

“Only 6% of secondary school principals said their schools had none of the five indicators in place before COVID-19 struck, compared with 24% of elementary school principals,” said the study. 

For those principals who were in more prepared schools – which was measured based on the number of indicators they had – these principals were more likely to assign letter grades to students. 

Controlling for varying school characteristics, 48% of school leaders in the survey were likely to assign letter grades during the pandemic. This percentage is based on those who had three or more indicators of preparedness at their respective institution. 

Additionally, these same principals were less concerned about failing to provide equitable online education for their students and were less likely to predict lower future achievement in students from low-income families and students who were homeless. 

While the researchers of the study admit that their findings do not establish causal evidence, nor does the study factor in school resources, the study does show that principals who had pre-pandemic educational practices set in place at their schools tended to be, “more optimistic about online instruction and student learning than other principals.” 

Moving forward, the surveyors conclude that more documentation on institutional practices is needed to fully understand how school leaders and administrators can provide equitable access to high quality online education. 

“Only then will we understand what is necessary to support student learning during prolonged school closures,” concluded the study. 

Education

NYC Schools to Close Temporarily Because of Rising COVID-19 rates
Education
NYC Schools to Close Temporarily Because of Rising COVID-19 rates

NEW YORK — New York City public schools will shut down temporarily starting Thursday because of surging coronavirus cases, top city officials said Wednesday. Schools Chancellor Richard Carranza said the closure would be "temporary" in an email to staffers Wednesday afternoon, but did not signal when schools would reopen. Mayor Bill de... Read More

Gen Z Voters Maintain Faith in Democracy, Despite Election Concerns
Research
Gen Z Voters Maintain Faith in Democracy, Despite Election Concerns
November 12, 2020
by Sara Wilkerson

WASHINGTON - In a Georgetown University focus group webinar of voters from Generation Z, the first-time voters expressed their excitement over participating in the democratic process, while at the same time voiced concerns about various influences on the election. The focus group explored how the youngest... Read More

Spanberger, Fitzpatrick Fighting to Omit VA Disability Compensation from Student Aid Consideration
Education
Spanberger, Fitzpatrick Fighting to Omit VA Disability Compensation from Student Aid Consideration
November 11, 2020
by Reece Nations

WASHINGTON – Reps. Abigail Spanberger, D-Va., and Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., jointly introduced legislation Wednesday that would exclude Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation from the list of benefits that have to be reported in a student’s application for Federal Student Aid.  Under current law, VA disability compensation must... Read More

National Press Club Takes Possession of 'Holy Grail of Broadcast Journalism'
Media
National Press Club Takes Possession of 'Holy Grail of Broadcast Journalism'
October 22, 2020
by Dan McCue

WASHINGTON - The BCC microphone used by CBS journalist Edward R. Murrow during his historic broadcast from war-torn London during World War II is taking up temporary residence at the National Press Club this fall. Casey Murrow, the legendary journalist's son, agreed to the loan while... Read More

An Illinois University Got Major Pushback for Cutting Religion, French and Anthropology. But Other Colleges Are Dropping the Humanities too
Religion
An Illinois University Got Major Pushback for Cutting Religion, French and Anthropology. But Other Colleges Are Dropping the Humanities too

CHICAGO — Scott Sheridan didn’t expect his 23 years of teaching at Illinois Wesleyan University to end like this. Though fewer students are pursuing degrees in his areas of study these days, many still participate. This semester, more than 50 students at the campus in Bloomington... Read More

Blue Dogs Host Roundtable Discussion on Rural Education and Workforce Development
Congress
Blue Dogs Host Roundtable Discussion on Rural Education and Workforce Development
October 9, 2020
by Sara Wilkerson

WASHINGTON - This week the Blue Dog Coalition hosted a roundtable discussion with experts in the K-12, higher and tribal education fields on rural education and workforce development. Blue Dog member Rep. Kendra Horn, D-Okla., moderated the roundtable discussion on behalf of the Coalition.  Horn recently... Read More

News From The Well
scroll top